Apply for planning permission

Find out how to submit a planning application, the cost and what documents are required.

As your Local Planning Authority we are responsible for deciding whether development in Northumberland should go ahead.

Most new development (new/altered buildings or changes to the use of buildings/land etc.) are likely to need an application for planning permission, also known as consent. However, some do not and are classed as permitted development. Before making an application find out if you need planning permission.

If you do require permission the next stage is to make an application by providing us with the correct form, fee and required documents. Follow the step-by-step advice below, if you need further information refer to the Planning Frequently Asked Questions page. Where permission is required this must be granted in writing before any work begins.

Firstly, you need to decide which type of consent you require according to the work you propose to carry out. This will help you choose the correct application form when you make your application.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for the following (6 weeks for proposed works to a listed building):

Lawful Development Certificate (existing)
Where confirmation is required that an existing use or development is lawful for planning purposes e.g. because the applicant believes the time limit for taking enforcement action has passed or where a planning condition was never dealt with and action can no longer be taken. Or perhaps after erecting an extension built under permitted development to prove that it is legal or to establish if a current use of the building is legal. This might be valuable in the event of selling the property. Read the LDC existing use/operation guidance.

Lawful Development Certificate (proposed)  
Where confirmation is required that a proposed use or development is lawful for planning purposes e.g. if you are satisfied the works fall within permitted development and no other consents are required but you would like formal confirmation. If granted, the certificate means that enforcement action cannot be carried out against the development referred to. If refused you may wish to apply to obtain Full Planning Permission (or householder planning permission) as a way forward. This might be valuable in the event of selling the property. Read the LDC proposed use/operation guidance.

Lawful Development Certificate (proposed works to a listed building)
To establish whether the works would be lawful i.e. they would not affect the character of the listed building and therefore, would not require listed building consent. If refused you may wish to apply to obtain Listed Building Consent as a way forward. Read the LDC listed building works guidance.

In some cases you may need to submit more than one consent type because they are decided under different regulations, e.g. if you are extending a dwelling that is also listed you may need Householder Planning Permission plus Listed Building Consent. When you are ready to apply you will be able to select an individual application form or on that combines two consent types into one application for ease. Advice will be provided if you need help choosing.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for the following (6 weeks for prior approval):

Prior Approval - Larger Home Extension
This application is specifically for a proposed 'larger' single storey rear extension to a house to determine if the effect on adjoining properties is acceptable. Use the Householder Planning Permission instead if your works exceed these limits: over 4m up to 8m for detached houses, over 3m up to 6m for all other houses. Read the larger home extension guidance.

Householder Planning Permission 
For extension to or works within the curtilage (boundary or garden) of a single dwelling (where works are not classed as permitted development/prior approval). Includes annexes to be used as part of the main residential building (ancillary). Use the Full Planning Permission form instead for: any works relating to a flat, building a separate house/holiday let in the garden, changes of use to part or all of the property to non-residential (including business) uses e.g. holiday lets, anything outside the curtilage of the dwelling (e.g. stables if in a separate paddock). Read the householder application guidance.

Householder Planning Permission and Demolition in a Conservation Area
As per householder above plus demolition of an unlisted building or structure in a conservation area. Read the demolition in a conservation area guidance.

Householder Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent  
As per householder above plus alterations, extension or demolition of a listed building. Read the listed building consent guidance.

In some cases you may need to submit more than one consent type because they are decided under different regulations, e.g. if you are extending a building that is also listed you may need Full Planning Permission plus Listed Building Consent. When you are ready to apply you will be able to select an individual application form or on that combines two consent types into one application for ease. Advice will be provided if you need help choosing.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for the following (this increases to 13 weeks for major applications or 16 weeks if the application requires an Environmental Impact Assessment):

Full Planning Permission  
A detailed planning application for development, uses include change of use of buildings or other land (not falling within permitted development or prior approval), new dwellings/holiday lets, works to flats, works outside the curtilage of a dwelling (e.g. stables in a paddock or use of agricultural land as part of a garden), other non-residential buildings. Read the full planning permission guidance

Full Planning Permission and Demolition in a Conservation Area  
As per full planning above plus demolition of an unlisted building or structure in a conservation area that exceeds exceed 115 cubic metres or to take down any wall, gate or fence which is 1 metre or more high where abutting a highway, or 2 metres or higher elsewhere. Read the demolition in a conservation area guidance

Full Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent
As per full planning above plus alterations, extension or demolition of a listed building, object / structure fixed to it or within it's curtilage. Read the listed building consent guidance

Full Planning Permission and Consent to Display an Advertisement(s)
As per full planning above plus where permission is also required to display advertisements, signs, fascias, panels etc (whether illuminated or not). Read the consent to display an advertisement guidance

Outline Planning Permission (some matters reserved/all matters reserved)  
Used to establish whether development is acceptable in principle before submitting full details as some or all of these can be reserved. It has the advantage that detailed drawings are not needed. Once outline permission has been granted, you will need to ask for the details to be approved. This is known as reserved matters and must be done before work can start. Read the outline planning permission guidance

Approval of Reserved Matters  
Submit detailed matters for consideration following a grant of outline planning permission. Read the approval of reserved matters guidance.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for the following: 

Listed Building Consent
An application for alterations, extension or demolition of a listed building. Full Planning Permission/Householder Planning Permission may also be required for works involving the external alteration/extension of the listed building. Read the listed building consent guidance note.

Demolition in a Conservation Area  
Use for proposals which involve demolition of any unlisted building or structure in a conservation area where no other works are proposed. You do not need permission to demolish a building which does not exceed 115 cubic metres or to take down any wall, gate or fence which is less than 1 metre high abutting a highway, or less than 2 metres high elsewhere.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for works to protected trees and 6 weeks for trees in a conservation area or hedgerow removals: 

Tree works  
An application to fell or carry out works to a tree or trees protected by a Tree Preservation Order (TPO) or in a conservation area (CA). If your works affect TPO trees and those within a CA we will require one application for the works to TPO trees and a separate one for the works to trees in a CA as they are decided under different regulations and with different time limits. The form can be used for either application type. If a TPO tree falls within a conservation area then the application should be for Tree Works: works to trees subject to a tree preservation order. Read further tree works guidance and options for dangerous trees.

Hedgerow Removal Notice
Use where permission is required to remove all or part of a protected hedgerow. An important hedgerow is a hedge which has existed for 30 years or more and satisfies one or more of the criteria listed in Part 2 of Schedule 1 of the Hedgerow Regulations 1997.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for advertisement consent.

Use where permission is required to display advertisements, signs, fascias, panels etc (whether illuminated or not). Note: even signs that are normally permitted under advertisement consent require separate listed building consent if they are attached to listed buildings. Read the consent to display an advertisement(s) guidance.

We aim to make a decision within 28 days of receiving a valid application for a non-material amendment, 8 weeks for an approval of details reserved by a condition or removal or variation of a condition (or 13 weeks for removal/variation where the original application was a major): 

Removal or Variation of a Condition (also known as a section 73 application) 
An application to have a planning condition changed or removed for an existing planning permission e.g. to enable you to change the design/layout. You cannot vary or remove conditions on a reserved matters application or vary the red line boundary from the originally approved application, this would need a new reserved matters or full planning application. However, you can vary and discharge conditions on this application type. We will consider the application and decide whether to: grant planning consent subject to different conditions, remove the condition entirely or decide not to amend the condition at all. Read the removal or variation of a condition application guidance. 

Non-Material Amendment
Use if you need to make a non-material (minor) amendment to an approved scheme following a grant of planning permission. Note: this application type cannot be used to make amendments to a Listed Building Consent. In this case a new Listed Building Consent application would be required. Read the non-material amendment application guidance

Approval of Details Reserved by a Condition (also known as discharge of conditions) 
Certain conditions (stated on the previous decision notice) require additional information to be submitted which prevent development from starting until the details have been agreed or may require certain aspects of the work to have this information submitted and agreed before a building can be occupied. Where this is the case an application to discharge those conditions must be made in order for the permission to remain valid. You cannot discharge the conditions from two previous applications on one discharge of conditions application e.g. if you have an original householder planning permission and a listed building consent. This is because each application will have it's own set of conditions. Failure to discharge the conditions and comply with the requirements of a permission may result in enforcement action being taken. Read the discharge of conditions guidance.

To see whether the conditions relating to the original planning application decision notice or subsequent variation applications (VARYCO) have been discharged check the planning application history on our Public Access website.

We aim to make a decision within 8 weeks of receiving a valid application for advertisement consent.

Use where permission is required to display advertisements, signs, fascias, panels etc (whether illuminated or not). Note: even signs that are normally permitted under advertisement consent require separate listed building consent if they are attached to listed buildings. Read the consent to display an advertisement(s) guidance.

Some minor works are known as permitted development (PD) and can be carried out without the need to make an application. However certain classes of permitted development require you to make an application for ‘prior approval’ to seek confirmation that development within certain limits is acceptable before work can commence. These include prior approval for changes of use, new development, demolition or agriculture and forestry. Read more about the various types of prior approval on the Planning Portal website.

The decision timescales are 56 days for most prior approval applications with the exception of 50 days for telecommunications masts, 42 days for overhead electricity lines and larger home extensions and 10 days for road applications. This includes non-working days (Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holidays). 

Hazardous Substances Consent (HSC) is required when substances on a site are at, or in excess of the 'controlled quantity' as set out in the Planning (Hazardous Substances) Regulations 2015. What constitutes a Hazardous Substance are set out within the same regulations.

You cannot apply for HSC on the Planning Portal. An online 'wizard' to guide applicants through the major-hazard information required in an application for hazardous substances consent is provided on the HSE website. Apply for Hazardous Substances Consent on the HSE website. The Gov.uk website explains what to include in your application and how much it will cost. The timescale for a decision is 8 weeks from the date we receive all the required information/fee. Pay for your application online.

Public Register of Sites
Section 28 of the Planning (Hazardous Substance) Act 1990 requires the Council to maintain a public register of hazardous substances sites. To view all the applications in Northumberland pick Hazardous Substances Consent Application from the drop down Application Type list (leaving all other fields blank).

The aim of the temporary fast track deemed consent route under section 74B of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 is to enable urgent changes to construction working hours to support safe construction working in line with the government’s latest social distancing guidance on construction and other outdoor work. For many construction sites, implementation of this guidance requires changes to working practices, including staggered starts and finishes, requiring different hours of operation to those which are currently permitted for the site through planning conditions. Local Authorities have 14 calendar days to determine such applications and no fee is required. Visit the .gov.uk website for further guidance on the modification of planning conditions relating to construction working hours.

This application type cannot be made on the Planning Portal and should be made directly to Northumberland County Council. Applications can only be made electronically. Email the completed Application Form for Modification of Conditions relating to Construction Working Hours to planning@northumberland.gov.uk.
Most applications require a fee, which must be submitted at the same time as your application. Exemptions include listed building consent, demolition in a conservation area, works to trees, hedgerow removal and discharge of condition applications on these.

View the Planning Application Fees (and exemptions) List or use an online fee calculator to help you. Refer to the Planning Fees and Charges Supplementary Guidance Document if you have further questions relating to fees. Make your payment when ready to apply at Step 4.

Please note: if you make your application online (or use the above fee calculator) the fee calculation will include the Planning Portal's service charge (this does not apply if you do not make your application online or if the application fee itself is under £60). The service charge is retained by the Planning Portal (which is not part of Northumberland County Council (NCC)) to cover the cost of providing their online system. The rest of the payment you make (the planning application fee itself) will be passed on to us (NCC) by the Portal. There is no VAT applied to planning fees, however VAT does apply to the Planning Portal service charge. If you are applying directly to us please ensure you do not include the Portal service charge in your payment.
Residential and Tourism Development within 10km of the Coast 
All minor applications within 7km of coastal designated sites and all major developments within 10km of them that will cause a net increase in the number of residential units or tourism accommodation require mitigation to ensure that they will not have an adverse effect on these sites through increased recreational disturbance. A map of these zones can be found by clicking on the ‘Policy ENV2 - Coastal Mitigation Service’ layer on the Northumberland Development Plan Policies Map. The most straightforward way to provide such mitigation is through a financial contribution to the Northumberland Coastal Mitigation Service.  

Contributions to Sport and Play in former Tynedale and Wansbeck District Areas
The Community Infrastructure Levy (Amendment) (England (No. 2) Regulations 2019 came into force on 1 September 2019.  These regulations make a number of important changes to the operation of the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) and section 106 planning obligations. These changes included removing altogether the ‘pooling restriction’ which prevented charging authorities from entering into more than five section 106 obligations to fund a single infrastructure project and allowing authorities to charge developers for the costs of monitoring planning obligations.

Following a review of the relevant legislation and policy, Northumberland County Council will be requesting contributions towards Sport and Play infrastructure in the Tynedale and Wansbeck Areas for development of one or more dwellings for any application validated on or after 1 April 2020.

The relevant documents and guidance are available to view on our website but you will be contacted by the case officer if this applies to your planning application. 


Section 106 Agreements - Guidelines on Contributions to Play & Sports Facilities (Tynedale District Council Area)

Section 106 Agreements - Guidelines on Contributions to Play & Sports Facilities (Wansbeck District Council Area)

Next gather the correct documents together ready to submit with your application.

Submitting a valid (complete) application is straightforward if you follow the advice in our Planning Application Validation Checklist. It explains how to ensure your application and supporting documents meet our requirements by specifying when a document is needed and what it should include. 

Planning Application Validation Checklist (2017 version)

Why your application should be valid upon receipt
The date we receive all the required information and fee is known as the valid date. The application will only be passed to a Planning Case Officer when it is valid meaning the determination period will only start from the date the application is valid and not when your application was first received (unless valid when received). As such it is important to ensure your application is complete when it is submitted. Please take the time to assess your application against the Checklist before you submit it.

Following the formal public consultation in April, Planning Services will be implementing a new Northumberland Validation Checklist (which will replace the previous Checklist dated August 2017). The new checklist will apply to all applications received on or after 4th July 2022 (applications submitted after 5pm Friday 1st June will be classed as received next working day of Monday 4th June).

The Planning Application Validation Checklist (below) is for use by applicants and agents when submitting planning and other related applications. It contains the full list of National requirements - (Notes 1-7) these are the same wherever you are in the country and are set out in more detail in planning legislation and Government guidance and Local requirements - (Notes 8-35) these are prepared by Northumberland County Council and reflect the material planning considerations that are relevant for our area.

To help you interpret this list we have also produced some quick reference checklists - by application type. Once you have worked out which application form/type you need you can then pick the checklist that matches the form. This will save you having to read through the full Validation Checklist.

Recent figures show that nearly 40% of applications submitted to Northumberland are invalid due to missing or incorrect information. Invalidating applications incurs additional time and financial resources for the Planning Service (which is also a cost to the taxpayer). It slows down the application process, resulting in customers waiting longer for us to validate new applications. We want to encourage a positive change in behaviour to reduce the high rate of invalid applications submitted and hope this new Northumberland Validation Checklist will make it clearer and easier to identify the requirements. Along with the new checklist, we will be introducing a new process for dealing with invalid applications: 

  • Where it is clear there are multiple invalid reasons meaning 4 or more requirements (documents or plans listed under the Validation Checklist notes) are missing or incorrect, we will close and refund the application. Applicants will be advised to refer to the checklist before making a new application.
  • Where there are less than 4 invalid reasons, we will advise what information is required and ask that it is submitted together within 21 days or the application will be returned.
Our aim is to encourage applications that are right first time. By streamlining the application process, we will be able to provide agents and applicants with a faster service.
The documents you need to include often depend on the scale or size of your development as well as any planning constraints that apply to that location/site.

Location and planning constraints

Whether or not a certain document is required can also depend on whether the site is within a certain area e.g. a Flood Risk Zone or is classed as a protected heritage asset e.g. listed building. These areas/lists are known as planning constraints. To enable you to check if any constraints apply to your site/proposal we have provided links at relevant points throughout the checklist to our Planning Constraints Map.

Access and check Maps of Coal Mining Development High Risk/Low Risk (Reporting) Areas using the Coal Authority Interactive Map Viewer

Size and scale of development

Householder applications: include development within the curtilage of a dwellinghouse: 
  • Includes: extensions, conservatories, loft conversions, dormer windows, alterations, garages, car ports or outbuildings, swimming pools, walls, fences, domestic vehicular accesses including footway crossovers, porches and satellite dishes.  
  • Excludes: any work to flats, changing the number of dwellings (flat conversions, building a separate house in the garden), changes of use to part or all of the property to non-residential (including business) uses, or anything outside the curtilage of the property (including stables if in a separate paddock). 
Curtilage is legally defined as "the enclosed space of ground and buildings immediately surrounding a dwelling-house”, or "the open space situated within a common enclosure belonging to a dwelling-house." Not all buildings have a curtilage. 

Minor applications: include any one or more of the following: 
  • residential development where 1 - 9 dwellinghouses will be provided (or site is 0.5ha or less if the number of dwellings is not known); AND 
  • building or buildings where floorspace to be created by the development is under 1,000sqm (includes buildings for residential use); OR 
  • site area is below 1 hectare. 
Major applications: include any one or more of the following: 
  • residential development where 10 or more dwellinghouses will be provided (or site is more than 0.5ha if the number of dwellings is not known); OR 
  • building or buildings where floorspace to be created by the development is 1,000sqm or more (includes buildings for residential use); OR 
  • site area is 1 hectare or more; OR 
  • all minerals and waste applications: mineral development consisting of the winning and working of minerals, infrastructure associated with their transport and the deposition of mineral waste; and waste operations and uses of land. A general list of matters which can be considered as waste operations is available in The Planning Practice Guidance.
Table Caption: Note 1. Application Form, Ownership Certificate and Agricultural Land Declaration
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A form setting out your development proposal and contact information. Required for:
  • All applications.

 

To process and record your application and confirm whether the landowner/agricultural tenant is aware of the application being made (where relevant).

Legislation: The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 Para 7(1)
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • complete all questions in full, sign, and date the form; and
  • complete only one certificate (either A, B, C, or D), when provided on the form. Include a completed copy of Notice One/Two where required.
How to prepare / further guidance

Applicants are encouraged to apply online through the Planning Portal. Alternatively, an application can be completed on a paper version of the form. Only 1 copy of the application form/supporting documents is required (not 3 as stated on the form).
 
Please read the guidance notes accompanying the application form. Where a certificate and agricultural land declaration is required it will already be provided as part of the application form. The guidance notes explain which certificate (A, B, C, or D) should be completed in which circumstance and provide links to notices which must be served on other owners or published in a local newspaper.
 
If an agent is named on the form all correspondence will go to them.






 
 
 
Table Caption: Note 2. Fee
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
The fees set by government that must be paid for certain applications. Required for:  
  • All applications unless a concession/ exemption from payment applies.
Planning fees in England are set nationally by the government and are detailed in The Town and Country Planning (Fees for Applications, Deemed Applications, Requests and Site Visits) (England) Regulations 2012 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the correct fee must be paid when the application is submitted.
How to prepare / further guidance

Please DO:

  • pay the fee directly to the Planning Portal if submitting your application via their online service or your application will not be passed on to us (we cannot take this fee directly);
  • pay the fee online directly to Northumberland County Council if submitting by email/post using our secure online payments page;
  • measure floorspace as external not internal when calculating fees based on floorspace; and
  • note for the purpose of the fee exemptions ‘disabled person’ is as defined in the following regulations and by choosing this exemption the applicant confirms the proposal and person qualifies for such an exemption under The Town and Country Planning (Fees for Applications, Deemed Applications, Requests and Site Visits) (England) Regulations 2012.






 
 
Table Caption: Note 3. Location Plan
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?

A plan which shows the application site in relation to the surrounding area and identifies the land to which the application relates.

View an example Location Plan

Required for:  

  • All applications not listed below. 

Not required for:  

  • Removal/Variation of a Condition
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition
  • Non-Material Amendment  
  • Approval of Reserved Matters. 
  • Tree Works.
To aid identification of the site and assess your application in the context of the surrounding area. 

Legislation: The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 Para 7(1&2) 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • plans must be drawn to an identified scale typically 1:1250 or 1:2500 (or as appropriate for larger sites);
  • show the direction of North;
  • identify the land to which the application relates with one continuous red line (include only the land necessary to carry out the proposed development such as: land required for access to the site from a public highway, visibility splays, landscaping, car parking and open areas around buildings); 
  • outline in blue any additional land immediately adjoining the site and under the ownership of the applicant (if not required as part of the proposed development). This only needs to extend as far as is visible on the submitted plan; and
  • use an up-to-date base map (showing the latest information) and sufficient roads and/or adjoining buildings or land to ensure the exact location of the site is clear; and
  • the plan must not be a photo/screenshot as this cannot be measured to scale.
Variations on the above requirements:
  • for Outline Planning Permission you must state the area or areas where access points to the development will be situated, even if access has been reserved (this can be shown on a location plan or a site plan);
  • for Prior Approval (apart from telecommunications or roads) the plan does not have to be to scale (but would assist us if it was) and the red line does not need to meet the public highway. (for Larger Home Extensions the floor area of the extension must be clearly indicated or hatched);
  • for Lawful Development Certificates/Certificate of Lawfulness you can submit either a location plan or a site plan with the red line clearly shown; and
  • for Section 106 applications the plan does not have to be to scale (but would assist us if it was) and the red line does not need to meet the public highway.  Ideally the submission would include the site plan from the original application but this is not mandatory.
How to prepare / further guidance

Purchase a location plan through the Planning Portal.
 
Please DO:

  • fit plans onto A4 or A3 size paper where practical;
  • show Easting and Northing grid references where possible to help us locate your site;
  • note if more land than is needed for the proposal is set out in red it can increase the fee or affect the reports required; and
  • note a large number of applications are made invalid because the red line does not include the access to the highway. Please ensure your red line meets the highway where required.





 

Table Caption: Note 4. Site Plans
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A plan showing the development in relation to the boundaries and on-site buildings (also known as a block plan). 

Both existing and proposed site plans are normally required. 

View an example of Site Plans

Required for:  

  • Prior Approval - change of use from agricultural building to residential.  
  • All other applications not listed below. 

Not required for:  

  • Applications where the changes are internal only /  the site layout or building footprint is unaffected e.g. for replacement windows or doors (with no change to the position/opening size). (Changes to boundaries and parking etc. will be classed as an external change.)
  • Prior Approval (other than agricultural building to residential).
  • Outline Planning Permission where layout/access is reserved. 
  • Tree Works.

To enable the impact of the development to be assessed in terms of its site and immediate surroundings. 

Legislation: The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 Para 7(2) and 5(3) 

What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • scale plans at a standard metric scale typically 1:100, 1:200, 1:250 or 1:500 (or as appropriate for larger sites);
  • show the direction of north;
  • provide both existing and proposed site plans, clearly labelled as such and showing the footprint of all buildings on site*;
  • show the following (unless these would not influence or be affected by the proposed development): buildings, roads and footpaths adjoining the site, trees on or adjoining the site, public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site, the extent and type of hard surfacing, boundary treatment including the type and height of walls or fencing (or gates), parking or access arrangements;
  • use an up-to-date base map (showing the latest information); and
  • the plan must not be a photo/screenshot as this cannot be measured to scale.
 Variations on the above requirements:
  • for Lawful Development Certificates/Certificate of Lawfulness you can submit either a location plan or a site plan with the red line clearly shown.
  • for Consent to Display an Advertisement(s) where multiple adverts are applied for a proposed site plan to a scale of either 1:100 or 1:200 showing the direction of north, all buildings on site, and the position of the advert(s) is required as a minimum.
How to prepare / further guidance

Search for a licenced Ordnance Survey map provider online or purchase a site plan through the Planning Portal.

Please DO: 

  • assist us by giving each plan a unique drawing number;
  • scale the plan to fit onto A4 or A3 size paper where practical;
  • note we will only accept a single combination site plan (existing with proposed indicated) if the proposed floor area is less than 1,000m2. Please label this as ‘site plan existing with proposed’ and make it clear what has been demolished / altered / added;
  • *note retrospective applications will still need to provide existing and proposed plans (existing being what was there originally and proposed being what has been completed/or what it will look like once completed); 
  • help us assess your variation of condition application by submitting site plans where there have been changes following approval;
  • assist our rights of way consultee by showing any impact the development will have on the position and surface of any public right of way (including any requirement for temporarily/permanently diverting or stopping up for the development); and
  • for applications including new dwellings or other appropriate development you are encouraged to indicate the location and type of proposed cycle storage e.g. internal/external - garage/shed/lockable cycle store . This can prevent the information being requested during the decision-making process or added as a condition. This is to encourage non-car transport and reduce CO2 emissions in accordance with National Planning Policy Framework paragraphs 104, 105 and 110. It will also assist in the delivery of our Climate Change Action Plan 2021-2023.

 

Table Caption: Note 5. Design and Access Statement
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A statement explaining the design of your proposal and how it is a suitable response to the site and its setting. Required for:
  • All major applications.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Applications within a designated area (conservation area or World Heritage Site), where the proposed development consists of: one or more dwellings; or 
    a building or buildings (including extensions) with a floor space of 100 square metres or more. 
Not required for:
  • Applications for a change of use.
  • Applications for waste development, engineering or mining operation.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
They provide an opportunity for applicants to explain how the proposed development is a suitable response to the site and its setting and demonstrate that it can be adequately accessed by prospective users.
 
Legislation: The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 Para 9 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Design and Access Statement; and
  • make it clear in the title that a Heritage Statement is included if you choose to incorporate this into your Design and Access Statement.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Conservation Areas
  • World Heritage Sites

To find out what should be included in your statement read the Gov.uk Guidance on Design and Access Statements. Good design practice information is provided in the National Design Guide and the National Model Design Code.

For new residential developments, the Design and Access Statement should make clear that the proposal meets the requirement for 20% of new open market dwellings and 50% of affordable dwellings to meet or exceed the enhanced accessibility and adaptability housing standards in order to comply with Policy HOU 11 of the Northumberland Local Plan (unless an exemption listed in Policy HOU 11 applies).










 
Table Caption: Note 6. Outline Planning Applications
What is it? What is required? What can be reserved?
A means of establishing the principle of a proposed
development without having to supply all the details. The grant of outline planning permission will then be conditional upon the subsequent approval of details of ‘reserved matters’.
 
An outline application may also contain details and seek approval of one or more of the reserved matters, but at least one must be reserved for later approval.
 
We do not accept an outline application for a listed building.
The minimum level of information that must be submitted with outline applications is as follows:

Use: The use or uses proposed for the development and any distinct development zones within the application site.

Amount of development: The scale or quantity of development proposed (per use class) and any distinct development zones within the application site.

Indicative access points: An area or areas in which access point or points to the site will be situated.
Layout: The way in which buildings, routes and open spaces are provided within the development and their relationship to buildings and spaces and any distinct development zones within the application site.

Scale: The height, width and length of each building proposed in relation to its surroundings.

Appearance: The aspects of a building or place which determine the visual impression it makes. This includes the external built form of the development, its architecture, materials, decoration, lighting, colour and texture.

Access: The accessibility to and within the site for vehicles, cycles and pedestrians in terms of the positioning and treatment of access and circulation and how these fit into the surrounding network.

Landscaping: This is the treatment of private and public space to enhance or protect the amenities of the site through hard and soft measures. This may include, for example, planting of trees or hedges, screening by fences or walls, the formation of banks or terraces, or the layout of gardens, courts or squares.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • indicate the area or areas where access points to the development proposed will be situated on the submitted plans even if access will be a reserved matter.









 
Table Caption: Note 7. Fire Statement
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
It will support the consideration of information on fire safety matters as they relate to land use planning matters (e.g., site layout, water supplies for firefighting purposes and access for fire appliances). Also known as ‘Planning Gateway One’. Required for:
Applications for planning permission or Prior Approval that propose the following relevant buildings:
  • two or more dwellings (or educational accommodation) and
  • meets the height condition of 18m or more in height, or 7 or more storeys.
This includes new buildings, development of existing buildings and development within the curtilage of a relevant building.
 
“Dwellings” includes flats, and “educational accommodation” means residential accommodation for the use of students boarding at a boarding school or in later stages of education.
 
Not required for:
  • A material change of use that would not / no longer result in the provision of a relevant building.
  • Outline Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Outline Planning Permission.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition..
To ensure fire safety matters as they relate to land use planning are incorporated at the planning stage for schemes involving a relevant high-rise residential building.
 
Legislation: Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure and Section 62A Applications) (England) (Amendment) Order 2021 (”the 2021 Order”).

Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development etc.) (England) (Amendment) (No. 2) Order 2021.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Fire Statement;
  • must be submitted on the correct form published by the Secretary of State (or a form to similar effect) contain the particulars specified or referred to in the form; and
  • will be required to include information on the entire development as set out on the location plan which identifies the land to which the application relates.
How to prepare / further guidance
Further details on how building height is measured, how storeys are counted for planning gateway one and the specific legislation is available at GOV.UK: Fire safety and high-rise residential buildings.
 
Download the Secretary of State template (form) fire statement for use by applicants. Please also read the guidance note to accompany the fire statement form.









 
Table Caption: Note 8. Application Plans
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed? How to prepare/further guidance
Existing and proposed elevations:
Drawings that show what your development looks like from the outside (usually all four sides of a building).
Required for:
  • All applications for new buildings/ structures or where existing elevations are to be altered (includes sheds, summerhouses, window alterations or replacement).
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s) where the adverts are to be attached to a building or structure.
  • Prior Approval for change of use from agricultural building to residential and change of use from arcades/casinos to residential.
Not required for:
  • Prior Approvals not listed above.
  • Change of use with no external alteration.
  • LDC*
To assess what the finished development will look like from the outside.
 
Legislation:
The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015 Para 7
 
Guidance: Making an Application.
  • scale plans at 1:50 or 1:100,  include a scale bar;
  • show all external sides of the proposal that will change, or from which the change will be seen;
  • where a proposed elevation adjoins another building/ structure or is in close proximity the drawing should clearly show the relationship between the two;
  • show all window and door openings and check floor plans match elevations; and
  • show the proposed building materials, style and finishes.
Existing and proposed floor plans:
Diagrams showing the floor layout of your development, including the relationship between rooms, space and other features such as walls, windows and doors in each storey of a building.
Required for:
  • All applications where new floor space is proposed (including sheds and summerhouses). 
  • Applications for new/ amended window/ door openings. 
  • Listed Building Consent for internal changes. 
  • Prior Approval for change of use from agricultural building to residential and change of use from arcades/casinos to residential.
Not required for:
  • Prior Approval applications not listed above.
  • Applications for change of use/replacement windows where there are no changes to window or door locations or opening size. 
  • LDC*
  • scale plans at 1:50 or 1:100, include a scale bar;
  • clearly indicate where existing buildings or walls are to be demolished;
  • show all window and door openings and check floor plans match elevations;  
  • must show the direction of North;
  • both existing and proposed floor plans are required; and 
  • include any floor that will change.
Existing and proposed roof plans:
A diagram setting out the shape/ design of a roof (shown from an aerial view).
Required for:
  • Applications where changes to the shape of the existing roof are proposed e.g. changing a flat roof to pitched or addition of dormer windows etc.
  • Listed Building Consent or applications within a conservation area where any changes to the roof are proposed.
Not required at validation:
  • For new buildings.
  • Prior Approvals.
  • For any applications not shown above. However, these may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.
  • scale plans at 1:50 or 1:100, include a scale bar;
  • we will also accept roof plans drawn on site plans at 1:100, 1:200 or 1:500 scale but would prefer 1:100 scale;
  • show the shape of the roof, its location, and include any relevant details; and
  • must show the direction of North.
Existing and proposed site sections/ levels:
Diagrams showing cross-sections of a development and surrounding land.
Not required at validation
 
These may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.
  • scale plans at 1:50 or 1:100, include a scale bar; and
  • show how the proposed development relates to existing site levels and adjacent land (with levels related to a fixed point which serves as a reference or base for the measurement).
Advertisement drawings:
Diagrams that show proposed adverts and details of any associated illumination and fittings.
Required for:
  • All applications for Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
To assess the advert proposal on existing buildings and the local area.
 
Legislation:
The Town and Country Planning (Control of Advertisements) (England) Regulations 2007
  • scale plans at 1:50 or 1:100, include a scale bar;
  • show the advert size, the siting, colours and fixings;
  • show the height above the ground and extent of projection;
  • show a cross-section through all signs including through supporting structures or walls; and
  • make sure plans match the dimensions set out in the application form.
Window / door details:
These detailed drawings will be required in addition to the 1:50/1:100 scale elevation drawings described above. 
Required for:
  • Listed Building Consent for alterations to windows and doors.
Not required for:
  • Like for like repair.
  • LDC*
To assess the impact of your proposals on the Listed Building.
  • for any alterations, replacement, or installation of features such as windows, doors elevation and sectional drawings to a scale of 1:20 or less;
  • further details of features such as architrave, horns, glazing bars, lintels, transom, mullions, panelling, mouldings, meeting rails etc. may need to be at a scale of 1:5 or less; and
  • specify the proposed materials and colour.
Boundary details (fence/ wall/ gate):
Elevation drawings showing a representative portion of the boundary and existing and proposed site plans showing their exact location.
Required for:  
All applications for new or altered fences, walls or gates where the boundary would:
  • exceed 1m above ground level and be located adjacent to a highway (or 2m for a school/nursery);
  • exceed 2m above ground level elsewhere;
  • be demolished within a conservation area;
  • be surrounding or within the curtilage of a listed building.
For the above purposes  a highway is considered to be a road or a footpath directly adjoining/abutting a road.

Not required for:  
  • Prior Approval.  
  • Like for like repair. 
  • LDC*
The Case Officer may request elevations following validation where they consider these necessary or where the right to put up or alter fences, walls and gates has been removed by an article four direction or a planning condition.
To assess what the finished development will look like and how the changes could affect highway safety or neighbouring amenity. 
  • both existing and proposed elevation drawings are needed for altered boundaries, however only proposed elevations are needed where a boundary does not already exist; 
  • scale elevations at 1:20, 1:50 or 1:100, include a scale bar; 
  • state the material and colour of the boundary treatments on the elevations or material section of the form; 
  • note: both existing and proposed site plans are needed for altered/new boundaries. The requirements for site plans are described in Note 4 above. Please include the type and height of the boundary on these plans e.g. Timber post and rail fence 1.5m high. 
  • *we cannot assess at validation what changes are permitted development or require permission so if boundary alterations are indicated on the site plan / application form the above details will be requested unless the site plan clearly states they are permitted development; and 
  • section drawings are helpful but not a requirement. 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • comply with the ‘How to prepare/further guidance’ above; 
  • clearly distinguish existing plans from proposed plans in the drawing title(s);
  • scale plans as required above and state the scale on the drawing;
  • for garden sheds, summerhouses and greenhouses we will accept a product brochure/drawing that shows measurements in place of a scale. These must be legible, show all the required detail and measurements (in metric) as well as windows and door positions and all elevations otherwise we may request a scaled drawing;
  • submit plans at the correct paper size so the scale measures as stated (e.g. we cannot accept a drawing that states the scale as 1:100@A1 on a page sized at A3 as it will not measure correctly on paper or online);
  • submit plans at A4 or A3 where possible; and
  • we do not accept photographs of plans.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Conservation Areas
  • World Heritage Sites

Please DO:

  • make sure each plan has a unique reference number; 
  • note retrospective applications will still need to provide existing and proposed plans (existing being what was there originally and proposed being what has been completed/or what it will look like once completed). If no existing plans can be drawn to show what was previously in place photos can be accepted; and
  • *LDC (Lawful Development Certificates): although the above information is not mandatory it is recommended you submit these as part of your evidence depending on your development (as described on the application form guidance notes). Your application may be delayed or refused if you do not provide sufficient evidence.









 
Table Caption: Note 9. Affordable Housing Statement
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A statement setting out how and whether affordable housing provision requirements will be met as part of the proposal.
Required for:  
Major proposals for 10 or more dwellings (or less than 10 dwellings but 0.5ha or more site area). 
 
Minor applications for 5-9 dwellings in the Northumberland Coast AONB. 
To enable the Council to determine whether national and local affordable housing policy requirements are met.
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework – chapter 5. Delivering a sufficient supply of homes and Annex 2 Glossary: definition of Affordable Housing

Northumberland Local Plan   

Policies HOU 2, HOU 4, HOU 5, HOU 6, HOU 7, HOU11, ENV 5, ENV 6 and INF6, Appendix D 

Made Neighbourhood Plans 
Cramlington - Policy CNP7, Embleton - Policy 9, Hexham -Policy HNP10, Morpeth - Policy HOU4, Wooler - Policy 4

What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes an Affordable Housing Statement.
How to prepare / further guidance

Check our Planning Constraints Map for:

  • Northumberland Coast AONB
  • Low, medium, high or highest value areas.

The following minimum affordable housing contributions will be required depending on which value area the site is within: 

  • low value areas - 10% affordable (5-9 dwellings within Northumberland Coast AONB / less than 10 / dwellings but 0.5ha or more site area / 30 or more dwellings); 
  • medium value areas - 15% affordable (5-9 dwellings within Northumberland Coast AONB / less than 10 / dwellings but 0.5ha or more site area / 30 or more dwellings); 
  • high value areas - 25% affordable (5-9 dwellings within Northumberland Coast AONB / less than 10 / dwellings but 0.5ha or more site area / 10 or more dwellings); or 
  • highest value areas - 30% affordable (5-9 dwellings within Northumberland Coast AONB / less than 10 / dwellings but 0.5ha or more site area / 10 or more dwellings). 

​Please DO:

  • check whether your site will be required to provide affordable housing or a financial contribution in lieu of on-site provision; and
  • ensure your report is as up to date as possible.









 
Table Caption: Note 10. Air Quality Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Air Quality Assessment:
A report demonstrating the expected changes to air quality or exposure to air pollutants as a result of a proposed development and identify mitigation measures.
Required for:
  • Applications where there would be an increase of 100 parking spaces. 
  • Development in excess of 100 dwellings or 10,000 square metres floorspace.
  • Proposals that include a combined heat and power plant.   
  • Proposals for industrial processes where there are direct emissions to the air. 
  • Proposals for new minerals sites or extensions to existing sites.  
  • Proposals for significant changes to highways infrastructure such as dualling works, new roundabouts.
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
To ensure your development does not lead to an adverse impact on air quality.
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework - paragraph 186

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies POL2, QOP 2 and STP5 (Health and Wellbeing) 
Biomass Boiler Information Form:
A completed form providing details of the boiler that Public Protection can use to assess what controls and mitigation need to be applied to any new biomass boiler.
Required for:
  • Proposals that include a new/replacement biomass boiler.
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes an Air Quality Assessment/Statement or (where applicable) must include the completed Biomass Boiler Information form; and
  • ensure your Air Quality Assessment has been produced within the last 3 years. If major new development including road infrastructure has taken place near to the site a more recent assessment would be required. An up-to-date addendum would be accepted.
How to prepare / further guidance
Air Quality Assessments

Where the developer feels an Air Quality Assessment is not necessary even though it meets the above ‘required for’ categories, we will require an Air Quality Statement justifying the reasons why. Note: it may delay your application if the Case Officer identifies that a full Assessment is required during consideration of the application.  Biomass Boilers
 
Please download the Biomass Boiler Information form and submit it with your application (you don’t need to send this to Public Protection as we will consult them as part of the application). Any information requested on the form should be added to the proposed site plan submitted with the application.









 
Table Caption: Note 11. Archaeological Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
In the first instance, an assessment will typically comprise of an 
Archaeological Desk Based Assessment (DBA):
The Local Planning Authority will use the assessment to appraise the likelihood that archaeological features (both known and unknown) survive within the site and to determine if further archaeological fieldwork is required.   
Required for:
Proposals that include ground intrusion where the following are within the red line boundary: Scheduled Monument, Registered Battlefield.
 
Developments within the World Heritage Site (Hadrian’s Wall) that involve ground intrusion (however if the development is within the buffer zone it is not required at validation but may be asked for by the Case Officer following consultation with Archaeology).

Greenfield sites of 1ha or more in size where the proposal involves ground intrusion. However, this will not be required where an applicant:
  • has been advised through consultation with archaeology at pre-application that this is not required; or
  • submits information that demonstrates significant previous ground disturbance (e.g., open cast mining, but not presence of previous buildings).
Proposals where it has been identified at pre-application that an Assessment is required.
 
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Listed Building Consent. 
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Developments with no ground intrusion or for landscaping/temporary works.
The National Planning Policy Framework - paragraphs 194 and 195 sets out the need to understand the impact of development proposals on heritage assets and the need for the Local Planning Authority to take this information into account when determining a planning application. 
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework – Section 16: Conserving and Enhancing the Historic Environment and Section 4: Decision-making
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Historic environment section

Northumberland Local Plan   
Policies ENV 7, ENV8, WAT 2 and MIN 1. 

Made Neighbourhood Plans  
Acomb - Policy 9, Hexham - Policy HNP4, Lesbury - Policy 9. 
Archaeological Building Assessment:
This is a programme of work to establish the character, history, dating, form and archaeological development of a specified building, structure or complex and its setting.   
Required for:
  • Listed Building Consent that includes demolition.
  • Applications where it has been identified through Pre-application advice that an Assessment would be necessary.
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes an Archaeological Desk Based Assessment or Archaeological Building Assessment.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Scheduled Monuments 
  • World Heritage Sites (including Hadrian's Wall)
  • World Heritage Sites Buffer Zone 
  • Registered Battlefield 
  • Listed Buildings 
Archaeological Desk Based Assessment  
The assessment must be produced by a suitably qualified archaeologist. The archaeological desk-based assessment is an assessment of the known or potential archaeological resource within and around the development site. It consists of a collation of existing written, graphic, photographic and electronic information to identify the likely character, extent, and significance of the known or potential archaeological resource within the development site. It should include an assessment of the direct (physical) impacts of the proposed development on the setting of the heritage assets affected. Development proposals affecting the Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site must include a heritage impact assessment of the effect on the Outstanding Universal Value of development proposals on the site and its wider setting.  The designated heritage assets above can be checked on Historic England's National Heritage List for England (NHLE) map search facility. Information on all known heritage assets (designated and undesignated) can be obtained from the Council’s Historic Environment Record.
 
Subject to the results of the DBA, further phases of archaeological assessment may be required, potentially including some or all of the following methods of assessment: fieldwalking (surface collection), walkover survey, geophysical survey, topographic survey, intrusive evaluation (trial trenching).
 
Archaeological Evaluation Report (Field Walking, Earthwork Survey, Geophysical Survey and/ or Trial Trenching)  
Where further archaeological assessment is required the evaluation must be undertaken by a suitably qualified archaeologist. Archaeological field evaluation is a limited programme of fieldwork which determines the presence or absence of archaeological features, structures, deposits, artefacts or eco-facts within the development site. It could comprise of some or all of the following strands: field walking (surface collection of artefacts, usually following ploughing), walkover survey (notably in upland areas where archaeological earthworks may survive), geophysical survey and trial trenching.  Where remains are present the field evaluation defines their character, extent, quality and preservation and enables an assessment of their significance.
 
Archaeological Building Assessment and Recording  
Standing buildings, structures and complexes form part of the archaeological resource and should be treated in an equivalent manner to other parts of the resource. The assessment must be undertaken by a suitably qualified archaeologist or buildings historian. An Assessment may not be required at validation however it may be requested later by the Case Officer or following consultation with the Environment and Design Team.

Please DO:

  • seek advice from Historic England for sites on or close to Scheduled Monuments;
  • note although an assessment may not be requested at validation it may be requested later by the Case Officer or consultation with the County Archaeologist. If you are in any doubt whether an assessment will be required you are advised to seek pre-application advice; and
  • note: The County Archaeologist can provide further advice on what will be needed to meet the above requirements.









 
Table Caption: Note 12. Coal Mining Risk Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
There are existing recorded risks to the ground stability from coal mining legacy hazards (e.g., shallow mine workings, mine gases and mine water).
 
A Coal Mining Risk Assessment (CMRA) is a report that identifies site specific coal mining risks and sets out the changes/actions required to show that the site can be made safe and stable for the proposed development.
The coalfield is divided into 2 areas, referred to as Development High Risk Area and Development Low Risk Area (also known as the Coal Mining Reporting Area).

If your site is within a Development High Risk Area a Coal Mining Risk Assessment will be required unless the development is exempt. 
 
A CMRA will not be required at validation if the wider site extends into the Development High Risk Area but the area of built development is located in the Low Risk (Reporting Area). 
 
Not required for (exempt):
  • Any application in the Development Low Risk (Reporting) Area.
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Approval of Reserved Matters.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Prior Approval.
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition not related to layout or coal mining.
  • Hazardous Substances Consent.
  • Extension of Time.
  • Changes of use or other development with no significant groundworks*. (applications relating to modular buildings proposed to be occupied are not exempt).
View the full list of exemptions on the .Gov website.
 
*examples of insignificant groundworks are bin stores, smoking shelters, storage containers and solar arrays as they are unlikely to require deep/extensive foundations or groundworks and are often placed on the surface or slabs. Surface scraping and installation of loose covering materials is also insignificant.
A desk based CMRA should accompany the planning application to demonstrate how you will ensure that your
site is suitable for its proposed use taking account of ground conditions and any risks arising from land instability.
 
Where a site is affected by land stability issues, responsibility for securing a safe development rests with the developer and/or landowner. 
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework paragraphs 183 and 184
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Land Stability section  

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies POL 1, MIN 2, WAT 1, WAT 3 and WAT 4. 
 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Coal Mining Risk Assessment;
  • check any desk-based report has been produced within the last 4 years. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted if the main report was produced over 4 years ago or for example if the proposed development has changed since a previous application. A site investigation report however can be older than 4 years because it is based on intrusive investigation of the ground and therefore the results will provide factual confirmation of existing coal mining features which will not change; and
  • do not submit a Coal Mining Report, Enviro-all-in-one Report, CON29M or similar in place of a CMRA as it is not adequate. These reports only represent the first stage of the risk assessment process ‘a’ below, whereas the Coal Mining Risk Assessment must also address issues b, c and d below.
How to prepare / further guidance
Access and check Maps of Coal Mining Development High Risk/Low Risk (Reporting) Areas using the Coal Authority Interactive Map Viewer.
 
The Coal Authority Guidance for Developers 2017 provides a model template for the report.

The CMRA should be prepared by a competent person and should address the following:
  1. Site specific coal mining information
  • past/present/future underground mining;
  • shallow coal workings (recorded or probable);
  • mine entries (shafts and adits);
  • mine gas;
  • current licensed areas for coal extraction;
  • any geological features;
  • any recorded surface hazards; and
  • past/present surface mining sites.
  1. Identify what risks these coal mining features, including cumulative effects, pose to new development;
  2. Identify how coal mining issues have influenced the proposed development scheme (e.g., layout) and what mitigation measures will be required to manage those issues and/or whether any changes have been incorporated into the development proposals; and
  3. Confirm whether the prior written permission of the Coal Authority will be required for the site investigation and/or mitigation works and indicate when this permission will be sought.









 
Table Caption: Note 13. Coastal Change Vulnerability Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
The purpose of a vulnerability assessment is to assess the coastal change processes, sea defences, future policies and risk posed to the development. 

The assessment will need to demonstrate that the development is not at risk from coastal change over the lifetime of development.  
Required:
  • All applications within a Coastal Change Management Area (CCMA) that are not listed below. 
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission for an extension or Planning Permission for a non-residential extension that is not seaward side. (However, if development is a sub-division into additional dwelling units or non-residential premises it will be required).
  • Lawful Development Certificate.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Approval of Reserved Matters.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Developments involving external works such as fascia’s, windows etc
  • Redevelopment (knock-down rebuild) – as long as the footprint of the building is no closer seaward side than previous.  
  • Development is a change of use and is of the same vulnerability (see Table 2 of Planning Practice Guidance – Flood Risk and Coastal Change).
Only certain types of development can be permitted within a Coastal Change Management Area (CCMA): An area identified in plans as likely to be affected by physical change to the shoreline through erosion, coastal landslip, permanent inundation or coastal accretion.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 171-173
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policy WAT 5
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan – Policy 4.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a - Coastal Change Vulnerability Assessment; and
  • ensure your report has been produced within the last 3 years. An up-to-date addendum would be accepted.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Coastal Change Management Area
Please appoint a professional to produce your Vulnerability Assessment.

Development in a Coastal Change Management Area will be appropriate only where it is demonstrated that:
  • it will be safe over its planned lifetime and not have an unacceptable impact on coastal change;
  • the character of the coast including designations is not compromised;
  • the development provides wider sustainability benefits; and
  • the development does not hinder the creation and maintenance of a continuous signed and managed route around the coast.
Useful links









 
Table Caption: Note 14. Daylight and Sunlight Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment of sunlight / daylight on a property and its neighbours as a result of a development. Required:
  • Only when it has been identified through Pre-application advice that an Assessment would be necessary.
A Case Officer may request an Assessment following validation where the current levels of sunlight / daylight enjoyed by neighbouring properties/buildings may be affected by the development on site or vice versa for part of the same development.
To assess the impact of development on neighbours and assess whether adequate daylight and sunlight will be received by the new development.
 
National Policy
National Design Guide - paragraph 126

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies QOP 2, QOP 5 and HOU 9. 

Made Neighbourhood Plans 
Allendale - Policy ADNP1, Alnwick and Denwick - Policies H2 and E5, Cramlington - Policies CNP1 and CNP25, Embleton -  Policy 4, Hexham - Policy HNP4, Lesbury -  Policy 3, Longhorsley - Policy LNP4, Morpeth - Policy Des1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan – Policies 5, 16 and 18, Ponteland - Policies PNP1 and PNP2,  Stannington - Policy 10, Thirston - Policy 1,  Whittington - Policy WNP3, and Wooler - Policy 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Daylight and Sunlight Assessment; and
  • ensure the assessment is as up to date as possible, it should be updated if the design of the scheme changes and this would have implications for the daylight assessment.
How to prepare / further guidance
Use the pre-application advice service if you are unsure whether your proposal requires a Daylight and Sunlight Assessment.
 
The assessment should be carried out in accordance with the British Research Establishment document Site Layout planning for daylight and sunlight: a guide to good practice. A daylight, vertical sky component, sunlight availability and shadow study should be undertaken and assessed against the criteria set out in the BRE document.
 
Search the web for ‘Daylight and Sunlight Assessment Northumberland’ to find a local consultancy to prepare your report.









 
Table Caption: Note 15. Ecological Checklist, Surveys and Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Ecology Checklist:
This must be submitted with your application to demonstrate an assessment of your development has been made.

See Appendix A – Ecology Checklist (Word document)

 

Required for:
  • All applications not listed below.
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificate.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition (not related to ecology).
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition.
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval  (however, for change of use from an agricultural building to residential the Planning Case Officer may need to request the information prior to determining the application. It would prevent delays if the applicant could complete the Ecology Checklist and provide a copy of this along with any surveys/assessments it identifies as being required).
To understand the ecological issues associated with a development and avoid delays in determination, create a better scheme and avoid breaches of legislation.
Ecology Report:
A report setting out the findings of any Ecological Impact Assessment and/ or Bat survey carried out on site.
Required for:
All applications when the Ecology Checklist has indicated that a report is required unless:
  • a pre-application response confirms in writing that a survey/report is not required.
To protect and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 179 - 182
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Natural Environment section

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies ENV1, ENV2 and MIN1

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Allendale - Policies ADNP7 and ADNP8, and North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policy 3.
Nutrient Budget:
A completed Lindisfarne Nutrient Budget Calculator or River Eden Nutrient Budget Calculator* as appropriate
 
It is necessary for nutrient budgets to be submitted with planning applications for developments that could increase nitrogen levels in the Lindisfarne SSSI and SPA through increases in sewage discharges, whether these are going to a private sewage treatment plant or a Northumbrian Water sewage treatment works.

It is only possible to grant permission for the development if the nutrient budget shows that there will not be a net increase in nitrogen or phosphorus levels in the protected area as a result of the development.
Required for: 
All applications within the catchment of the Lindisfarne streams or the River Eden unless listed below for:
  • New residential units.
  • Commercial developments providing overnight accommodation (including caravan sites /pitches/holiday lets).
  • Agricultural development for additional livestock barns, slurry stores etc. where it is likely to lead to an increase in herd size.
  • Anaerobic digesters.
Not required for: 
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Discharge of conditions applications.
  • Variation of conditions applications.
  • Tree works or hedgerow applications.
To protect and enhance biodiversity and geodiversity.
 
Nutrient pollution (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus) is having a negative effect on certain rivers and waterbodies in England, disrupting natural processes and impacting wildlife. The source of excess nutrients varies but certain uses/sites increase the risk. 
 
The submission of a nutrient budget enables the Local Authority to assess the risk. The aim is that nutrient damage to European sites and SSSIs will not be made worse by development, allowing nature to recover.
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 174; 180-182 
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Natural Environment section
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies ENV 2, WAT 1, WAT 2, Pol 2
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
Ecology Reports
  • the title must state the document is/includes an Ecological Impact Assessment / Bat (and Barn Owl) Survey;
  • a statement on the front cover must make it clear if the report a) reveals the location of badger setts, and/or b) reveals the nesting sites of birds of prey vulnerable to illegal persecution; 
  • surveys should have been undertaken within the past two years; and
  • surveys must not state they are a 'draft' version, they must be a 'final' version.
Nutrient Budgets
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Nutrient budget; and
  • prepare your budget using the most recent version of the calculator.
How to prepare / further guidance
Ecology Report
The Ecology Checklist provides guidance on how to prepare an Ecological Impact Assessment/Bat Survey. The Planning Authority may require an Ecological Assessment to be submitted at a later stage if it becomes clear that important ecological features may be affected by your proposal.

Nutrient Budget

Firstly check if your site is within the Lindisfarne SSSI and Special Protection Area Catchment on our Planning Constraints Map. *This is a new requirement and as such guidance is still being prepared for a River Eden catchment area, this will be added as soon as it is available. 

Natural England has created a Nutrient Budget Calculator in the form of an Excel workbook that you will need to complete and has provided a guidance document to help with this: Please DO:
  • note for tourism attractions of a scale likely to attract day visitors from outside of the catchment of the Lindisfarne streams or River Eden (as appropriate) and some Discharge of conditions applications or Variation of conditions applications  this information may be requested later by the Case Officer.









 
Table Caption: Note 16. Flood Risk, Surface Water and Drainage
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Flood Risk Assessment:
A report assessing whether development will be safe for its lifetime and can be delivered without increasing flood risk elsewhere.
Required for:
  • All applications where flood zones 2/3 cover any part of the site within the red line (including the access from the public highway) even if they do not come close to/cover the area of built development.
  • Sites of 1 hectare or greater.
Not required for:
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Prior Approval for; householder larger home extensions, demolition, telecommunications, overhead lines, roads, solar PV equipment on a building, collection facility within curtilage of a shop and temporary use of building/land for film making.
To ensure your development does not lead to an adverse impact on flooding.

Legislation
The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015 (procedure for prior approval)
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – section 14 paragraphs 159 - 169
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Flood Risk and Coastal Change section  

Northumberland Local Plan 
Policies WAT3, WAT4 and WAT5  

Made Neighbourhood Plans  
Acomb - Policy 4, Hexham - Policy HNP9, Morpeth - Policy Inf1,  Ponteland - Policy PNP27.
Sequential Test (flooding from all sources):
The purpose is to guide development to areas at lowest risk of flooding, by requiring
applicants to demonstrate that there are no alternative lower risk sites available where the
development could take place.
Required for:
  • Major applications for new development in flood zones 2 and 3.
  • Change of use to a caravan, camping or chalet site, or to a mobile home or park home site in flood zones 2 and 3.
Not required for:
  • Change of use (unless to a caravan, camping or chalet site, or to a mobile home or park home site).
  • Changes to an existing building.
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificate.
  • Listed Building Consent. 
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval. 

The NPPF requires a sequential test is applied for developments to ensure all sources of flooding are considered including tidal, fluvial, surface water and groundwater.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – section 14 paragraphs 165 and 166
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Flood Risk and Coastal Change section paragraphs 19-21

Northumberland Local Plan  
Policy WAT 3.  
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans  
Ponteland - Policy PNP27.
Foul Drainage Assessment:
Used to establish whether a proposal for new or connection to an existing non-mains drainage would be acceptable..
Required for:
  • Any application where the development involves the disposal of foul sewage, effluent or trade waste other than a mains connection to a public sewer (including replacement systems).
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission (unless for replacement/new non mains drainage).
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Any application where there is no foul drainage proposed or no change/additional load to an existing non-mains drainage.
To allow the local planning authority to have sufficient information to evaluate the risks posed by foul drainage, in line with:
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 20 and 21

Northumberland Local Plan   
Policy WAT 2 and WAT 3.
Surface Water and Drainage Assessment/Strategy:
An evaluation of surface water flooding, which establishes surface water management required as a result of the development, giving preference to SuDS. 
Required for:
  • All major applications.
Not required for:
  • Prior Approval.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
To demonstrate how a development can mitigate against increased flood risk with the inclusion of SuDS.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – section 14 paragraph 167
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Flood Risk and Coastal Change section  

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies WAT3, WAT4 and WAT5. 

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Alnwick and Denwick - Policy ENV9, Cramlington - Policy CNP8, Lesbury - Policy 3, Longhorsley - Policy LNP13, Morpeth - Policies Des1 and Inf1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policy 5,  
Ponteland - Policy PNP28, Thirston - Policy 1, Whittington -  Policy WNP3, Wooler - Policy 5. 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?

Flood Risk Assessment/Surface Water and Drainage Assessment/Sequential Test

  • the title must state the document is/includes a Flood Risk Assessment/Surface Water and Drainage Assessment/Sequential Test; and
  • check your report has been produced within the last 3 years and is up to date. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted; 

Foul Drainage Assessment

  • provide a plan (or add to your site plan) with dimensions that clearly shows the location of the whole non-mains drainage system in relation to the proposed development and the position of the known key elements e.g. septic tank, drainage fields and points of discharge; and
  • your application will not be made invalid if you do not provide the scaled public sewer map however it may be delayed if this information is needed later. You can obtain these from Northumbrian Water.
How to prepare / further guidance

Flood Risk Assessment

  1. For both residential extensions and non-residential extensions  (e.g. Householder Planning Permission) of less than 250 square metres in Flood Risk Zones 2 and 3, a simple flood risk assessment form can be submitted instead of a full Flood Risk Assessment.
  2. If the above does not apply and your application is for a vulnerable development as classified by the Environment Agency you should follow the Standing advice for vulnerable developments.
  3. If your development is not covered by the standing advice please follow the advice on the Flood risk assessment for planning applications and the Flood risk assessment checklist.

Check the Environment Agency’s Flood Map for Planning to see whether your application is in flood zone areas 1, 2 or 3 or within 20m of a main river or flood defence and

  • identify the risk of all forms of flooding to/ from the development;
  • set out how these flood risks will be managed;
  • identify opportunities to reduce the probability and consequences of flooding;
  • include design of surface water management systems (including SuDS); and
  • address the requirement for safe access to/ from the development in flood risk areas.
Further guidance:

Foul Drainage Assessment

Download the form from the Environment Agency webpage
 
The form is intended to help Local Planning Authorities establish basic information about your non-mains drainage system and decide whether you need to submit a more detailed site assessment. A detailed site assessment will not be requested at validation but may be requested by the Case Officer before a decision can be made.

Surface Water and Drainage Assessment

Find out if your application site is affected by medium or high surface water flood risk or rivers and the sea, Check your long term flood risk service on Gov.uk
 
To find out if your application site contains an ordinary watercourse check on an Ordnance Survey (OS) map. Excludes mains and other pipes which belong to the Environment Agency, the NRBW etc for the purpose of providing a supply of water to any premises.

Include details of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) measures you may incorporate: 

Sequential Test (flooding from all sources)

It is possible to have a development site which is within Flood Zone 1 - the lowest risk of flooding from tidal/fluvial sources, but it is within a high-risk surface water area. The sequential approach should be used in areas known to be at risk now or in the future from any form of flooding. 
 
The strategic flood risk assessment will provide the basis for applying this test, however further information and mapping should be used:










 
Table Caption: Note 17. Healthy Planning Checklist/Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Healthy Planning Checklist
Used to quickly assess the potential health impacts of development proposals and help to identify simple measures to maximise the positive health impacts and minimise or mitigate against the negative health impacts.

See Appendix B – Healthy Planning Checklist (Word document)
Required:
Major applications for Outline or Full Planning Permission or Approval of Reserved Matters..
 
Not required for:
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition. 
  • Non-Material Amendment.  
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Prior Approval. 
  • Lawful Development Certificates. 
  • Minerals / waste applications.
A completed Healthy Planning Checklist will be required to determine whether the potential impact on health resulting from the development warrants any further assessment.
 
A Rapid/Full Health Impact Assessment may also be required to include proposals to mitigate any potential adverse health impacts, maximise potential positive impacts, and help reduce health inequalities.
 
National Policy
HM Government. The Health and Social Care Act (2012)
 
HM Government (2010). Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our strategy for public health in England
 
Ministry of Housing, Communities & Local Government. Guidance on promoting healthy and safe communities wellbeing
 
National Planning Policy Framework – section 8 promoting healthy and safe communities

Northumberland Local Plan
Policy STP5 Section 3

Northumberland Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy (2018 to 2028)

Made Neighbourhood Plans 
Cramlington - Policy CNP25.
Rapid/Full Health Impact Assessment:
The Healthy Planning Checklist will help determine whether a Rapid or Full Health Impact Assessment is also required.
Required:
Large scale major applications for Outline or Full Planning Permission or Approval of Reserved Matters:
  • 100 or more residential dwellings/housing units.
  • 10,000sqm (non-residential) floor space to be created.
  • minerals and waste applications.
Not required for:
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition. 
  • Non-Material Amendment.  
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Prior Approval. 
  • Lawful Development Certificates. 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Healthy Planning Checklist or Rapid/Full Health Impact Assessment.
How to prepare / further guidance

Rapid/Full Health Impact Assessment

This assessment should be undertaken by a relevant professional in this field.
 
Further information is provided in the Guidance Note on Health Impact Assessments for Planning Applications. You can also contact Northumberland County Council Public Health through our Development Management team for guidance and advice on the HIA, and the potential health impacts on which to focus. This should be undertaken at the earliest opportunity.
 
Please DO:
  • ensure the assessment is as up to date as possible. 









 
Table Caption: Note 18. Heritage Statement
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A statement that describes and assesses and identifies the impact on the significance of heritage assets on the site.
 
It is sometimes referred to as a Statement of Heritage Significance or Heritage Impact Assessment.

This can be included as part of a Design and Access Statement. 
Required for:
Applications where the red line boundary contains a listed building.
 
Applications within a conservation area that include any external works.
 
Major applications where the site includes:
  • scheduled monuments;
  • registered historic parks and gardens;
  • registered battlefields; or
  • world heritage sites
Note: For minor applications with the potential to affect the setting of the above heritage assets an Assessment may be requested by the Case Officer following validation.

Not required for:
  • Change of use in a conservation area with no external works.
  • Lawful Development Certificates (although these can be supplied as evidence for proposed works to a listed building).
  • Prior Approval.
To understand the impact of the proposal on the significance of any heritage assets.
 
NPPF states local planning authorities should require an applicant to describe the significance of any heritage assets affected, including any contribution made by their setting.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 189 - 208
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies - ENV 7, ENV 8 and ENV9.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
Acomb - Policy 8, Allendale - Policies ADNP7 and ADNP8,  Alnwick and Denwick - Policies HD3, HD5 and HD7, Cramlington -  Policy CNP22, Embleton - Policy 5 and 7, Hexham - Policies HNP3, HNP4 and HNP7, Lesbury - Policy 8 and 9, Longhorsley - Policy LNP17, Morpeth - Policy Her1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan – Policies 10, 11, 12 and 13, Ponteland - Policy PNP5,  Whittington - Policy WNP4, Wooler - Policy 18.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Heritage Statement; and
  • photographs of the heritage asset illustrating it in context, its exterior and interior must be included (within the document itself).
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Listed Buildings
  • Conservation Areas
  • Scheduled Monuments 
  • Historic Parks and Gardens
  • Battlefields
  • World Heritage Sites (including Hadrian's Wall)
The Northumberland County Council Heritage Statement Guidance explains what a Heritage Statement must contain. You can produce this yourself for simple proposals, but it must contain everything we require. Building Conservation is a specialised discipline, and the method of work needs to be specified by experts with a knowledge and experience of historic buildings. “The level of detail should be proportionate to the assets’ importance and no more than is sufficient to understand the potential impact of the proposal on their significance”.  (NPPF, Paragraph 194). You are advised to employ a suitably qualified professional consultant or contractor with the necessary skills to assess the significance of heritage assets and the effects of the development proposals on that significance. The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) is the professional body for building conservation practitioners and historic environment experts working in England.
 
Useful links:









 
Table Caption: Note 19. Land Contamination and Mine Gas Protection
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Phase 1 Desktop Investigation Report:
A desk-based assessment of existing or potential contamination affecting a site.
 
The results of a Phase 1 Report will determine if further investigation is required.
Required for:
(as identified by the applicant/ agent on ‘Existing Use’ section of the 1APP application form):
  • Applications on land which is known to be contaminated.
  • Land where contamination is suspected for all or part of the site.
Applications for Full or Outline  Planning Permission for the following proposed vulnerable use:
  • new build residential developments (houses, flats, nursing homes etc);
  • change of use to residential development (however if no groundworks are proposed the works are exempt); and
  • development of allotments.
Applications where it has been identified through Pre-application advice that an Assessment would be necessary.
 
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area. 
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition (unless the condition(s) to which the application relates concern ground contamination).
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Proposals where no groundworks are proposed.
A land contamination assessment is required to ensure that known and potential contamination issues undergo an appropriate risk assessment. It should be noted that contamination can occur on greenfield sites as well as on previously developed land. Contamination can be caused by current/historic land uses or by naturally occurring sources. Examples of potentially contaminating land uses (Appendix 1).
 
The failure to effectively identify and treat contaminated land can be costly and adversely affect or restrict the beneficial use of land or certain types of development.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 174, 183 - 188
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Land affected by contamination section

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies - POL 1 and MIN 2.

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Cramlington - Policy CNP1.
Phase 2 Site Investigation Report:
The second stage of a phased Contaminated Land Assessment which involves intrusive excavation of the ground.
Required for:
  • All applications for full or Outline Planning Permission for any new build/change of use to residential property or to allotments where Council records indicate at validation that the site had a historical use which may have resulted in contaminated land. This will be checked at validation and you will be notified if this is required.
  • All applications where a Phase 1 Assessment is required and the results have clearly identified sources of contamination that warrant further investigation.
  • Applications where it has been identified through Pre-application advice that an Assessment would be necessary.
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area. 
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition (unless the condition(s) to which the application relates concern ground contamination).
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Proposals where no groundworks are proposed.
Ground Gas Protection Report: A report detailing how ground gas protection will be installed in the development to prevent the ingress of mine gases. Required for:
All applications for new build housing/residential units in the coal mining High Risk Area.
 
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificate.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition (unless the condition(s) to which the application relates concern ground gas).
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Tree Works and Hedgerow Removal Notice.
  • Prior Approval.
If the proposed development site is located in a Coal Authority Mining area then mine gas is a material planning consideration. We must be satisfied that the developer has taken account of the possibility that mine gas may migrate/ accumulate and affect their development, which may cause harm to the occupants.
 
This is necessary to prevent significant harm or death and is in line with the requirement of the NPPF paragraphs 183-185.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – ground conditions and pollution general
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Land affected by contamination section
 
Northumberland Local Plan Policies - STP5 and POL 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Phase 1 Desktop Investigation or Phase 2 Site Investigation or Ground Gas Protection Report.
How to prepare / further guidance

Please DO:

  • check your report has been produced to the latest standards/current guidance. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted;
  • note it is the responsibility of the applicant/agent to submit the appropriate Report (where required) with the application. Failure to submit the appropriate report will cause delays if Public Protection or the Case Officer need to request this later or may result in a recommendation for refusal; 
  • note it is acknowledged that there will be applications that fall outside of the above process. In these instances Public Health Protection will be consulted and a report may be requested following validation; and
  • ensure that the author of your Report is a competent and qualified person as defined in the NPPF.

Phase 1 and 2 reports

If you are undertaking a small development (i.e. a single dwelling) this Screening Assessment Form can be submitted as a basic Phase 1 contamination assessment.
 
Applicants who wish to check whether the development site is affected by contamination or who know or suspect contamination are advised to undertake pre-application discussion with the Planning or the Environmental Health / Contaminated Land Officer (or the Environment Agency for risks to controlled waters only). These are chargeable services. Further details are available for Planning Services pre-application service and Public Protection Pre-Application Planning Guidance.
 
For further guidance please refer to: Ground Gas Protection Report
 
The Northumberland Coalfield is divided into 2 areas, referred to as Development High Risk Area and the Coal Mining Reporting Area (Low Risk). The High Risk Area is considered high risk based on a number of coal mining related features which have the potential for a degree of risk to the surface from the legacy of coal mining operations, this includes recorded mine gas sites.
 
As a result of the extensive historical coal extraction which took place throughout Northumberland, there are a large number of mine shafts, drift’s and adits, which have never been formally identified or located. These have the potential to generate mine gases such as Blackdamp which can leave the air deficient of oxygen. Rising groundwater levels within the Northumberland Coalfield area, are also known to be associated with the increased risk of mine gas migration.
 
Please check the Coal Authority Interactive Map Viewer and ensure the High-Risk layer is turned on to see if your site is within the Development High Risk Area (you may have to zoom before you can tick high risk).
 
Although no report may be required for validation conditions may be applied to the decision notice if the application is approved requesting a report detailing the protective measures to prevent the ingress of ground gases (before construction) and a validation and verification report (before occupation).
 
Specific guidance is available governing general ground gas protection in the British Standard 8485:2015+A1:2019 - Code of Practice for the Design of Protective Measures for Methane and Carbon Dioxide Ground Gases for New Buildings. This is an appropriate document for designing mine gas protection.









 
Table Caption: Note 20. Landscape and Visual Impact Assessments
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment that evaluates the impacts of a development on landscape character and views.

Also known as an LVIA.
Required for:
Applications where it has been identified through Pre-application advice that an LVIA would be necessary for example:
  • Where a proposal is an EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment) development and the development would be likely to have a significant impact on the surrounding landscape and/or townscape/ seascape character of the site, including its context.  
  • Proposals for non-EIA development that could have a significant effect on the special qualities of the Northumberland Coast or North Pennines Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas, or the Hadrian's Wall World Heritage Site and its buffer zone. 
Whether a proposed development is likely to have a significant effect on these areas is a matter of judgement that cannot be undertaken at the validation stage. If you have not taken pre-application advice about your development proposal a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment may be requested later by the Case Officer.
 
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.  
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Prior Approval.
To ensure sites that are considered sensitive in landscape or visual terms (e.g., AONB) are not being adversely impacted by development.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 174 - 178

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies QOP 2, ENV 3, ENV 5, ENV 6, MIN 1, REN 1 and, REN 2.

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Alnwick and Denwick - Policy HD1,
Embleton - Policy 2, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policy 2, Ponteland Neighbourhood Plan – Policy PNP11, Whittington - Policy WNP1, Wooler - Policy 19.   
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty
  • Conservation Areas
  • World Heritage Sites (including Hadrian's Wall)
  • World Heritage Sites Buffer Zone
Use our pre-application advice service if you are unsure whether your proposal requires a landscape and visual impact assessment. Show how you have conformed to pre-application consultation if you have already obtained pre-application advice.
 
Refer to: Raw data and associated graphics, montages etc should be prepared by LVIA professionals in accordance with guidance and standards set out below. Viewpoints should be agreed in advance with the Council. The assessment of specialist areas (e.g., Heritage, landscape, AONB etc) should be undertaken by relevant professionals in that field and cross-referenced with the relevant EIA chapter. The LVIA should relate to the impact of your proposal and therefore should be carried out in parallel with the application unless a similar scale of proposal on the same site has been subject to an LVIA in the past 5 years, in which case that could be submitted.









 
Table Caption: Note 21. Landscape Strategy/Plan
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
This will include a detailed plan of the site, which will often specify the hard and soft landscaping elements that will be included in the project. The plan will also identify any existing features on the site that will be retained. Required for:
  • All major applications.
  • For other applications this may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.  
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Prior Approval.
Planning policies and decisions should ensure that developments
are visually attractive as a result of appropriate and effective landscaping.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 130 -174

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies INF 6, QOP 2, QOP 4, HOU 12, ECN 17, TRA 7, WAS 2 and INF 5. 

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Alnwick and Denwick - Policy ENV 7, Longhorsley - Policy LNP16.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Landscape Strategy/ Landscape Plan.
How to prepare / further guidance
Ensure your strategy/plan is as up to date as possible. It should be updated if the design of the scheme changes and this would have implications for the landscaping details.
 
The submitted scheme should include: 
  • Existing trees, shrubs and other landscape features (indicating which are to be retained and which removed); 
  • Planting plans, specifications and schedules; 
  • Existing and proposed levels and contours; 
  • Means of enclosure, walls, retaining walls and boundary treatment; 
  • Paving and other surface treatment including car parking and circulation layouts; items of landscape furniture, equipment, storage, signage, and lighting; services and drainage; 
  • Location of site cabins and compounds; 
  • The location of any watercourse and associated landscaping as existing and proposed should also be shown; 
  • Details of management and maintenance arrangements. 
These details should be cross-referenced with the Design and Access Statement where submitted. The National Design Guide and National Model Design Code illustrates how well-designed places that are beautiful, healthy, greener, enduring and successful can be achieved in practice.
 
Local design guidance and character assessments: British Standards guidance:
  • BS 4428:1989: Code of Practice for General Landscape Operations (Excluding Hard Surfaces) 
  • BS8545:2014 Trees: From Nursery to Independence in the Landscape 
  • BS 7370-1 to BS 7370-5: Grounds Maintenance.









 
Table Caption: Note 22. Lighting Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment setting out details of number, type, location, intensity, beam orientation, and intended hours of use for any external lighting.
 
This should also include assessment of any resulting light pollution (spillage) and glare.
Required for:
  • Sports complexes / pitches / fields with lighting proposed.  
  • Major flood lighting schemes.
  • Sites within a Northumberland Dark Sky Park area that propose any lighting.
A Lighting Assessment may also be requested by the Planning Officer during consideration of the application if there is/are:
  • potential adverse impact on biodiversity, bat roosts or feeding / commuting routes;
  • proposals with the potential to impact on residential amenity or adjacent sites e.g. ancillary car parks (including car lights);
  • lighting proposed for listed buildings.
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
To assess the impact of external lighting proposals affecting: 
  • publicly accessible areas (including external sports facilities and open floodlit menages);
  • community safety and antisocial behaviour;
  • existing residential property;
  • listed buildings;
  • conservation areas; and
  • open countryside.
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 185
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Light pollution section
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies QOP 3, QOP 5, TRA 7, WAS 2, ENV 4 and ENV 6.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
Allendale - Policy ADNP1, Alnwick and Denwick - Policies H2 and E5, Cramlington - Policies CNP1 and CNP25, Embleton - Policy 4,  Hexham - Policies HNP4 and HNP14, Lesbury - Policy 3, Longhorsley - Policy LNP4, Morpeth - Policy Des1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policies 5, 16 and 18, Ponteland - Policies PNP1 and PNP2, Stannington -  Policy 10, Thirston - Policy 1, Whittington - Policy WNP3, Wooler - Policy 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Lighting Assessment; and
  • check your assessment has been produced within the last 12 months or more recent if changes to the scheme or in the vicinity have taken place in the meantime. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Northumberland Dark Sky Park
  • Listed Buildings
The following should be included in your assessment:
  • a layout plan (to a recognised metric scale) showing the location of all light fixtures and beam orientation and spread patterns of illuminated areas with specified lux levels;
elevational details showing the position of the lighting units (whether freestanding or attached to existing buildings or structures);
  • the proposed times at which the lighting will be in use; and
  • mitigation measures to remove or reduce any adverse impacts.
Refer to the Institute of Lighting Professionals for guidance and useful resources. Refer to the following guidance where applicable Northumberland National Park Authority Local Plan and Northumberland Dark Skies Park - Exterior Lighting Master Plan









 
Table Caption: Note 23. Marketing Statement
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A statement detailing how, where and for how long the property/ land has been marketed, the number and type of enquiries received including feedback and reasons for refusing offers and the price marketed at.  Required for:
  • Conversion of a community facility (such as public house) to a non-community use (such as a dwelling house).
  • Removal of agricultural occupancy conditions.
A Marketing Statement may also be requested by the Planning Officer during consideration of the application if the proposal is for development on allocated employment sites for other uses.
 
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.  
  • Prior Approval.
To allow the case officer to properly assess the acceptability of a proposed development.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 123 & 201b
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies INF3, INF4, ECN 10 and ENV7.

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Acomb - Policy 3, Alnwick and Denwick - Policy CF1, Cramlington - Policy CNP23, Embleton - Policy 12, Hexham - Policy HNP19, Lesbury - Policy 5, Longhorsley - Policy LNP8, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policy 20, Ponteland - Policy PNP22, Stannington - Policy 1, Thirston -  Policy 6, Whittington - Policy WNP7, Wooler - Policy 22.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Marketing Statement.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check your statement has been produced within the last 6 months for INF3 and INF4. For ENV7 please refer to Historic England advice note Managing significance in Decision-Taking in the Historic Environment.

It will need to be demonstrated with sufficient documentary evidence that the building has been marketed at a price reflecting its current or last use for a period of not less than six months and that no reasonable offers have been received to continue the current use of the building.









 
Table Caption: Note 24. Mineral Safeguarding Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment of the effect of the proposal on the mineral resource beneath or adjacent to the site of the development. Required for:
Proposals for non-mineral development within a Mineral Safeguarding Area.
 
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area.
  • Approval of Reserved Matters.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Non-Material Amendment.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Prior Approval.
To ensure that known mineral resources are not needlessly sterilised by development either above the resource or near to it.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 210c and 210d
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies MIN 4 and MIN 5.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Mineral Safeguarding Assessment;
  • ensure the survey is no more than 3 years old. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted. 
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Minerals Safeguarding Areas
The document should:
  • include an assessment of the effect of the proposed development on the mineral resource beneath or adjacent to the site of the development;
  • consider the possibility of prior extraction ahead of the proposed non-mineral development taking place; and
  • consider the impact on mineral extraction operations and any impacts the mineral extraction operations could have on the proposed new development where it is located in the vicinity of an existing or proposed mineral extraction site.
If the assessment shows that the development would lead to sterilisation of mineral resources then it will need to be demonstrated that the proposal meets one of the exceptions listed in the Northumberland Local Plan Policy MIN 4 (part 3). This includes proposals in the minerals safeguarding area for coal, however due to the current national policy position on the reduction of carbon emissions it is accepted that in most circumstances prior extraction will not be desirable. 









 
Table Caption: Note 25. Noise Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Identifies the impact of noise pollution from potentially noisy proposed developments on existing nearby occupiers, protected species and/or tranquil landscapes; or the impact of existing noise in a locality on the future occupiers of proposed developments that are considered particularly sensitive to noise pollution. 
 
Required for:
Applications for planning permission for new build development or change of use to the following potentially noisy land-uses:
  • Drinking establishments (e.g., pubs, night clubs);
  • Hot food takeaways;
  • General industrial (Use Class B2);
  • Storage & distribution (Use Class B8);
  • Hotel (Use Class C1);
  • Café/restaurant (Use Class Eb);
  • Indoor sport, recreation or fitness (Use Class Ed);
  • Creche, day nursery or day centre (Use Class Ef);
  • Provision of education (Use Class F1a);
  • Public halls or exhibition halls (Use Class F1e);
  • Public worship or religious instruction (Use Class F1f);
  • Halls or meeting places for the principal use of the local community (Use Class F2b);
  • Areas or places for outdoor sport or recreation (Use Class F2c);
  • Indoor or outdoor swimming pools or skating rinks (Use Class F2d);
  • Theatres;
  • Amusement arcades;
  • Launderettes;
  • Petrol filling stations;
  • Scrap yards/vehicle dismantlers;
  • Casinos;
  • Concert/dance halls;
  • Bingo halls;
  • Mineral extraction;
  • Waste disposal;
  • Certain types of energy generation such as wind turbines, air/ground source heat pumps and biofuel production;
  • Railway lines and stations;
  • Classified A & B roads;
  • Airfields; or
  • Bus stations.
Applications for planning permission for new build development or change of use for a noise sensitive land-use adjacent or near to an existing potentially noisy land-use.
 
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Prior Approval.
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 174 & 185
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Noise section
 
Noise Policy Statement for England
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies STP 5, QOP 2, POL 2 and MIN 1.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
Allendale - Policy ADNP1, Alnwick and Denwick - Policies H2 and E5, Cramlington - Policies CNP1 and CNP25, Embleton - Policy 4, Hexham - Policy HNP4, Lesbury - Policy 3, Longhorsley - Policy LNP4, Morpeth - Policy Des1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policies 5, 16 and 18, Ponteland - Policies PNP1 and PNP2, Stannington -  Policy 10, Thirston - Policy 1, Whittington - Policy WNP3, Wooler - Policy 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Noise Assessment.
  • ensure the assessment is as up to date as possible, particularly where a background assessment is required. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted.
How to prepare / further guidance

Please note:

  • the lists of noise sensitive and potentially noisy land-uses are not exhaustive, and the Council reserves the right to request a Noise Assessment in other appropriate circumstances; and
  • a Noise Assessment may not be required where the potentially noisy land-use and noise sensitive land-use are the same (e.g., a proposed day nursery next to an existing day nursery) or where a noise sensitive land-use is proposed adjacent to or near a school. In such circumstances, please use our pre-application advice service.
Noise-sensitive land-uses include:
  • A dwelling(s) including apartments;
  • Care/nursing homes;
  • Schools;
  • Children’s day nurseries;
  • Hospitals;
  • Hotels;
  • Hostels;
  • Areas of open countryside outside of settlement boundaries (as defined in adopted local and neighbourhood plans) within the North Pennines and Northumberland Coast AONBs and Kielder Water/Forest Park - Check our Planning Constraints Map; and
  • Designated sites with protected species (e.g., SSSIs, SPAs, SACs, Ramsar sites, Local Wildlife Sites, Local Nature Reserves) - Check our Planning Constraints Map.
Noise Assessments should be prepared by a suitably qualified noise consultant in accordance with relevant accepted methodologies (refer to the guidance below) and shall include:
  1. measurements in respect of existing and/or proposed noise;
  2. assessment of the impact of such noise on the occupiers, protected species and/or tranquil landscapes referred to above; and
  3. details of mitigation measures to address harmful noise pollution impacts arising in respect of the proposed development.
Further information:
  • The Calculation of Road Traffic Noise (DEFRA, 1988) 
  • The Calculation of Railway Noise (Department of Transport, 1995)
  • The International Standard for Assessment of Environmental Noise ISO 1996 
  • Acoustics – Description and Measurement of Environmental Noise" is the principal standard referred to for environmental noise assessment 
  • BS 4142:2014+A1:2019 – Method for Rating and Assessing Industrial and Commercial Sound (British Standards Institution 2019) 
  • BS 8233:2014 – Code of Practice for Sound Insulation and Noise Reduction for Buildings; (British Standards Institution 2014) 
  • World Health Organisation Guidelines for Community Noise (1999) 
  • World Health Organisation Night Noise Guidelines for Europe (2009)
  • World Health Organisation Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region (2018)
  • BS5228-1:2009+A1:2014 Noise and Vibration Control on Construction and Open Sites (British Standards Institution 2014) 
  • ProPG: Planning and Noise - New Residential Development
  • ETSU-R97 Wind Farms
  • Institute of Acoustics (IOA) Guidance and Documents on Wind Turbine Noise









 
Table Caption: Note 26. Open Space Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment of open space proposed to be lost as a result of development. 

Open space includes all open space of public value such as formal sports pitches, open areas within a development, amenity spaces, linear corridors, areas of water and country parks.
Required for:
  • All planning applications for development on existing open space.
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Non-Material Amendment. 
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Prior Approval.
In accordance with National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 99, existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land, including playing fields, should not be built on unless:
  1. an assessment has been undertaken which has clearly shown the open space, buildings or land to be surplus to requirements; or
  2. the loss resulting from the proposed development would be replaced by equivalent or better provision in terms of quantity and quality in a suitable location; or 
  3. the development is for alternative sports and recreational provision, the benefits of which clearly outweigh the loss of the current or former use.
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 93, 98-103 and Annex 2 (glossary)
 
National Planning Practice Guidance - Open space, sports and recreation facilities, public rights of way and local green space section
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies STP 6, ENV 9 and INF 5
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
Acomb - Policies 1 and 2, Allendale - Policy ADNP11, Alnwick and Denwick - Policies CF2, ENV2 and ENV3, Cramlington - Policies CNP18 and CNP19, Embleton - Policy 6, Hexham - Policy HNP13, Lesbury - Policies 6 and 7, Longhorsley - Policy LNP9, Morpeth - Policies Env2 and Env3, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policy 19, Ponteland - Policies PNP15 and PNP24, Seaton Valley - Policy SV1, Stannington - Policy 4,  Thirston - Policy 5, Wooler - Policies 20 and 21.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is an Open Space Assessment;
  • ensure the assessment is as up to date as possible.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Protected Open Space
The assessment must include existing and proposed plans to an appropriate scale (e.g., 1:200/1:500/1:1000) showing any areas of open space within or partly within the application site. The area measurements should also be shown.
 
Any assessment should objectively appraise with equal weight, the quantity, quality, accessibility and functionality of the open space proposed to be lost. The assessment must also appraise the alternative provision of the type of open space to be lost in the immediate locality. This should focus on provision within the settlement in which development is proposed, and then neighbouring settlements and then the wider parish / ward. It should cross reference how provision compares to the standards (for quantity, quality, accessibility and functionality) set out in Appendix H1 of the Northumberland Local Plan. It must also demonstrate meaningful engagement with the local community, to understand how the open space, building or land is used and valued by the community, and the implications of its loss.
 
Where a planning application involves the loss of use for sport e.g., playing field, the local planning authority is required to consult Sport England (as set in Planning Practice Guidance). For applications affecting all or part of a playing field, Sport England's Playing Fields Policy and Guidance should be referred to. In addition, applicants should refer to the Northumberland Playing Pitch Strategy









 
Table Caption: Note 27. Planning Obligations – Heads of Terms
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An agreement in principle, but which is subject to a formal contract.
 
Planning obligations are private agreements negotiated between Local Planning Authorities and persons with an interest in a piece of land that seek to address various planning issues such as affordable housing, principal residency, education, healthcare, public open space provision, highway works or landscape and ecology and conservation mitigation.
Required:
  • Only when this has been identified through Pre-application advice that a Section 106 agreement would be necessary.
For other applications the need for a Planning Obligation may be determined and requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application. 
Planning obligations assist in mitigating the impact of unacceptable development to make it acceptable in planning terms. 

National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 55-57
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Planning obligations section

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies HOU 6, HOU 10, ENV 2, TRA 2, WAT 4, INF 1, INF 5 and INF 6.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans
Morpeth - Policies Sus1 and Hou5, Ponteland - Policy PNP1, Stannington - Policy 9.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes Heads of Terms
How to prepare / further guidance
To make the planning application process quicker, it is expected that head of terms will be submitted along with the application and the ownership and contact details necessary for the planning obligation to be progressed. Ensure the heads of terms are as up to date as possible. Use our pre-application advice service if you are unsure whether your proposal requires heads of terms contributions.









 
Table Caption: Note 28. Pre-application Consultation Statement (turbine development)
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
This statement enables the Local Authority to assess whether it can be demonstrated that the planning impacts identified by the affected local community have been fully addressed and the proposal has their backing.
 
It is important that applicants consult with local communities before submitting an application for wind turbine development and that local communities have the opportunity to comment on any proposals before the formal submission of an application.
 
This represents an opportunity for the local community to get involved and help shape the proposal before a formal application is submitted.
Required for: 
  • Applications involving developments of 2 or more wind turbines and/or any turbine with a hub height more than 15 metres. (Hub height is the distance from the turbine platform to the rotor of an installed wind turbine.)
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition.
  • Non-Material Amendment. 
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
  • Prior Approval.
  • Applications for the repowering of existing wind turbines.
  • Renewals of permission (as described in Article 20(1)(b)).
  • Outline Planning Permission where the Approval of Reserved Matters allow a phased development to take place (Article 20 (c)) or
  • Outline Planning Permission which was granted before 1 October 2010 or applications under section 90 of the T&CP Act (development with government authorisation).
Footnote 54 of the National Planning Policy Framework states (except for applications for the repowering of existing wind turbines) a proposed wind energy development involving one or more turbines should not be considered acceptable unless following consultation, it can be demonstrated that the planning impacts identified by the affected local community have been fully addressed and the proposal has their backing.
 
The Pre application consultation statement enables the Local Authority to assess whether this has been adequately demonstrated.
 
This is a Local Requirement based on:

Section 61W Town and Country Planning Act 1990 

Articles 3 and 4 Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) Order 2015

Footnote 54 of the National Planning Policy Framework

Northumberland Local Plan
Policy REN 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Pre-Application Consultation Statement.
How to prepare / further guidance
For these renewable energy developments, the Council will expect that there has been an appropriate level of community engagement, including the opportunity to help shape the development. For the application to be considered valid the statement must demonstrate the following: 
 
a) how the applicant complied with section 61W(1) of the 1990 Act; 
The Act requires developers to have regard to the advice of the Local Planning Authority in complying with the duty to consult. These guidelines should be followed in complying with this duty: 
  1. details of how to contact the developer to be able to comment on the scheme or collaborate with the developer on its design;
  2. information on a timetable for the duration of the consultation: It would be appropriate to follow national legislative good practice and for developers to give a minimum of 21 days for comments to be made; a longer timescale may be appropriate for larger and more complex applications; 
  3. form of the consultation: The requirement is to consult in a manner that brings the development to the attention of the majority of the persons who live in the vicinity. The optimum way of undertaking this is to write to individual addresses. An advert in a local paper is an option but this should be supplementary to and not instead of direct consultation. The relevant town or parish council should be included in the consultation; 
  4. consideration should be given to a range of methods for engaging people in the consultation, such as: 
    • a website providing information on the scheme and a facility to comment online; 
    • supplying householders with copies of the plans and supporting documents; 
    • depositing relevant documents in an appropriate local venue; 
    • exhibitions in the local area; and
  5. the extent of the consultation should be determined based on the proposal’s scale, location and relationship with others, particularly local residents and public places. 
b) any responses to the consultation that were received by the applicant; and  
 
c) the account taken of those responses. 
  1. details will be required of consultation responses received and how the applicant has addressed issues and concerns, whether/ in what way the proposed application was altered following consultation and prior to formal submission. 









 
Table Caption: Note 29. Statement of Consultations Undertaken
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
A statement setting out the consultation process that has been undertaken prior to submitting a planning application. 

This represents an opportunity for the local community to get involved and help shape the proposal before a formal application is submitted.
Required for:
  • All large major applications (200 or more dwellings, 10,000 sq. m or more non-residential floorspace, or a site size of 2 hectares or more).
The Council reserves the right to request such a statement following validation (or at validation where this is identified at pre-application stage) for schemes below this threshold if it is considered that it may affect a large number of people or whole communities and/or could be controversial
 
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition. 
To conform with the Councils' adopted Statement of Community Involvement

The views of local people about the potential impact of development in their area helps to ensure that decision-makers have relevant information to allow them to reach a sound decision.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Statement of Consultations Undertaken; and
  • ensure the statement is carried out as soon as possible before the submission of the application, although it is recognised that such an exercise may have been carried out in relation to a previous pre-application, in which case it should be no more than two years old.
How to prepare / further guidance
Use the pre-application advice service if you are unsure whether your proposal requires a Statement of Consultations Undertaken. Often the public are concerned that they do not learn about proposals that affect them until a planning application is made to the Council and publicised. The pre-application period presents an opportunity for this to be addressed. Prospective applicants for larger schemes that may affect a number of people or whole communities or that could be controversial are encouraged to enter discussions with the Council and local residents before submitting their application.
 
Northumberland Local Plan, Statement of Community Involvement, adopted February 2015
 
The Statement should:
  • show you have considered the above Statement of Community Involvement;
  • set out the responses received;
  • explain how the concerns expressed have influenced the content of the application; and
  • show evidence of conforming to 'pre-application consultation'.









 
Table Caption: Note 30. Structural Survey/Justification
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Structural Survey:
A report outlining the findings of a professional inspection of the condition of a structure, including details of necessary works required for conversion or development.
Required for:
Applications that propose:
  • structural alterations to a listed building.
Not required for:
  • Prior Approval.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
Not required at validation for:
  • Applications where there are doubts concerning the structural stability of the building (for example, conversions of listed buildings or a Scheduled Ancient Monument).
  • The conversion of an existing building where the scheme involves substantial demolition.
You are advised to submit a Survey at validation where this is known in order to avoid delay as this may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.
To demonstrate the capacity of the building for conversion/re-use and/or any structural alterations that may be required by the proposals.
Structural Statement (Justification):
Identifying the context and need for the demolition. This may include a structural survey. 
Required for:  
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area
Loss of a building (or other element) which makes a positive contribution to the significance of the Conservation Area can be considered harmful and requires justification. 
 
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Structural Survey/Structural Statement (Justification); and
  • ensure the survey is no more than 3 years old. An up-to-date addendum can be accepted.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Listed Buildings
  • Scheduled Monuments
  • Conservation Areas
Structural Survey
Consult an appropriate qualified specialist to conduct the survey, see the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) website for further information. Visit the RICS website to view an example of building condition report.
 
Structural Statement (Justification) 
The justification for a building’s proposed demolition will need to be proportionate to its relative significance and its contribution to the significance of the conservation area as a whole. Refer to Paragraph 201 of the National Planning Policy Framework for more information. 









 
Table Caption: Note 31. Transport Statements, Transport Assessments, Travel Plans, Parking, Highways and Road Safety Audits
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
For new development, changes of use of buildings or land and alterations to existing buildings, the transportation and accessibility outcomes of development needs to be set out as part of the planning application.  
 
Transport Assessments encompass the same basic matters as Transport Statements however:
 
A Transport Statement (TS) shall cover matters such as trip generation resulting from the development, improvements to site accessibility, car parking provision and internal vehicular circulation, traffic impacts of servicing requirements. It needs to identify the net level of change at the network over any current development within the site.
 
A Transport Assessment (TA) shall quantify and assess the impact of the proposals on traffic movement and highway safety, quantify and assess how the development could be accessed by alternative transport modes and how such alternative modes would be promoted and provide details of any proposals for access or transport improvements. It will show what the issues are by identifying the impacts of development with no mitigations. 
 
A Travel Plan (TP) is a long-term management strategy which aims to increase sustainable travel to a site through positive actions. It is set out in a document that is reviewed regularly.
Required for:
  • Developments that meet the relevant thresholds shown in the table below.
  • Also required following Pre-application advice that an Assessment/Statement/Plan is required.
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent. 
  • Prior Approval.
These documents are used to determine whether the impact of the development is acceptable or to identify measures to mitigate impacts on the highway network arising from the proposed development in order that it can be made acceptable.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 113
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Travel Plans, Transport Assessments and Statements section

Northumberland Local Plan
Policy TRA 1.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans Morpeth - Policy TRA3, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policies 8,9,16 and 18, Ponteland - Policy PNP29, Wooler - Policy 5.
Threshold Table - When are TSs, TAs and TPs required?
Land Use & Description of Development Size Pre-Application Advice Recommended Transport Statement Transport Assessment/ Travel Plan
B2 (General Industrial) 
General industry (other than classified as in B1), The former ‘special industrial’ use classes, B3 – B7, are now all encompassed in the B2 use class. 
GFA < 2500m2 > 2500m2 
< 4000m2
> 4000m2
B8 (Storage or Distribution) 
Storage or distribution centres – wholesale warehouses, distribution centres and repositories.
GFA < 3000m2 > 3000m2 
< 5000m2
> 5000m2
C1 (Hotels)
Hotels, boarding houses and guest houses, development falls within this class if ‘no significant element of care is provided’.
Bedroom < 75 bedrooms > 75 <100 bedrooms > 100 bedrooms
C2 (Residential Institutions - Hospitals, Nursing Homes)
Used for the provision of residential accommodation and care to people in need of care.
Beds < 30 beds > 30 < 50 beds > 50 beds
C2 (Residential Institutions – Residential Education)
Boarding schools and training centres.
Students < 50 students >50 <150 students > 150 students
C2 (Residential Institutions – Institutional Hostel)
Homeless shelters, accommodation for people with learning difficulties and people on probation.
Residents < 250 residents >250 <400 residents > 400 residents
C3 (Dwelling Houses)
Dwellings for individuals, families or not more than six people living together as a single household.  Not more than six people living together includes – students or young people sharing a dwelling and small group homes for disabled or handicapped people living together in the community.
Dwellings < 50 units >50 <80 units > 80 units
E
Shops, Financial and Professional Services, Food & Drink (mainly on the premises), Non-residential institutions (medical or health services, creches, day nurseries and centres), Assembly and Leisure (indoor sport, recreation or fitness, gyms).
TBD Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority
F1
Non-residential institutions (education, art gallery, museum, public library, public exhibition hall, places of worship, law courts)
TBD Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority
F2
Shop no larger than 280 sq. (selling mostly essential goods and at least 1 km from another similar shop), community hall, outdoor sport recreation area, indoor or outdoor swimming pool, skating rink.   
TBD Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority
Others / Sui Generis
For example; Stadium, retail warehouse clubs, amusement arcades, launderettes, petrol filling stations, taxi businesses, car/vehicle hire businesses and the selling and displaying of motor vehicles, cinema, concert hall, live music venue, bingo hall, nightclubs, theatres, builders yards, garden centres, POs. travel and ticket agencies, hairdressers, funeral directors, hire shops, dry cleaners.
TBD Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority Consult with Highway Authority
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Transport Assessment/Transport Statement/Travel Plan (as appropriate); and
  • ensure the document is no older than 3 years. Discussions will need to be undertaken by the applicant/agent with the Highway Authority to establish if there is mitigating circumstances if the developer wishes to rely on an older document.
How to prepare / further guidance

see Note 31. continued. How to prepare / further guidance (below)









 
Table Caption: Note 31. continued. How to prepare / further guidance
How to prepare / further guidance
Where a new development is likely to generate significant movements, a Transport Assessment (TA) and Travel Plan (TP) must be prepared. In some instances, a simplified report in the form of a Transport Statement (TS) may be sufficient, which can be incorporated into the Design and Access Statement where applicable. Any TA / TS or TP submitted that, when assessed by the case officer/consultee, fails to appropriately identify the development’s impact on an agreed basis would be subject to revisitation and further agreement before the application can be determined. As such you are advised to seek pre-application advice from the Local Planning Authority for definitive advice on the scope of these documents in order to avoid abortive work.
 
Developers will need to consider the cumulative impacts of proposals on all transport infrastructure and should seek to anticipate committed development and other known proposals via the pre-application service. Applicants that do not ascertain this information in advance of planning submissions may be required to undertake further work and analysis. (All transport infrastructure includes, walking, cycling, public transport and the private car and assessment priority should align with the NPPF, Local Plan and Neighbourhood plan policies.)

Other matters such as site access, existing parking pressures or the proposed number of parking spaces will need to be taken in account when deciding if a Transport Statement, Transport Assessment, Travel Plan or other supporting information is required. The following list, which is by no means exhaustive, may necessitate a Transport Statement, Transport Assessment and / or Travel Plan to be submitted if, in the opinion of the Local Planning Authority, the development proposal would:
  • not be in conformity with the adopted Local Plan;
  • generate 30 or more two-way vehicle movements in any hour;
  • generate 100 or more two-way vehicle movements per day;
  • be likely to increase accidents or conflicts among motorised users and non-motorised users, particularly vulnerable road users such as children, disabled and elderly people;
  • generate significant freight or HGV movement per day, or significant abnormal loads per year; and
  • be proposed in a location where the local transport infrastructure is inadequate – for example, capacity, substandard roads, poor pedestrian/cyclist facilities, highway safety concerns and inadequate public transport provisions.
Developers are advised of the need to liaise with National Highways in respect of any development for which a Transport Statement or Transport Assessment and Travel Plan is required or the development may affect the strategic road network. Developers are required to identify, protect and exploit opportunities for sustainable transport measures ahead of measures to address highway capacity deficit. This will be based on both green infrastructure principles and active design principles including ‘invisible infrastructure’, whereby the spatial grain and layout invites slow speeds and direct route priority with natural surveillance and lighting for active travel (walk, cycle, mobility friendly and public transport) over other modes. Developers are required to align Transport Assessment and Travel Plan deliverables and commitments to funding to avoid reliance on predict and provide outcomes.
 
Travel Plans
There are several types of travel plan:
  • Full Travel Plan.
  • Interim Travel Plan.
  • Framework Travel Plan.
  • Travel Plan Statement.
  • Area Wide Travel Plan (for a defined geographic area).
Where applicable, the contents of these shall include:
  • site location plan (strategic and local context);
  • site audit to include transport links, transport issues, barriers to non-car use and possible improvements to encourage sustainable modes;
  • travel surveys – include example of distributed survey, means of distribution, number distributed, number of responses, results and analysis etc;
  • clearly defined objectives, targets and indicators;
  • details of committed measures, timetable for implementing, marketing proposals and budget;
  • travel Plan Coordinator - definition of role, contact details etc; and
  • monitoring plan and mitigation proposals if targets not reached.
Parking and Servicing requirements
Parking and servicing need to be considered as an important part of any scheme.  Car parking provision needs to be at an appropriate level to cater for the development and visitors whilst considering the location, circumstances in the surrounding area, nature of the development, sustainability, impact on residential amenity and highway safety, and the availability of public transport. Servicing requirements need to be fully considered so they are not of danger or inconvenience. Information on parking and servicing can be combined within the transport assessment or transport statement where required or provided in a supporting document and/or annotated plans.
 
Information that may be sought includes:
  • setting out the rationale for the approach to parking provision (car, cycle, disabled and motorcycle provision);
  • car parking accumulation information;
  • car parking layout plan;
  • cycle parking layout plan;
  • servicing plan covering deliveries, refuse collection and storage and taxi pick up and drop off (Auto tracks may be required in some instances);
  • parking and servicing management plan;
  • existing and proposed Traffic Regulation Orders Plan for a defined area;
  • details of Car Club and Electric Charging Point Facilities; and
  • amendments to Parking Places Order.
Applications for changes of use to apartments which claim they are for social housing requiring lower levels of parking provision, will need to be supported with suitable evidence.
 
Highways and Public Rights of Way
Some highways and or public rights of way may need to be stopped up or diverted as part of the development. To understand the impact of the development the proposed changes will need to be set out on a plan and include any areas of Highway/Public Rights of Way to be stopped up. The amount of information will be appropriate to the type and scale of development.
 
New Highways 
A proposed new development may necessitate the creation of new highways that may or may not be identified for future adoption by the Highways Authority. To understand the impact of the proposed development any future highway to be adopted needs to be detailed on an appropriate plan. If the highways within the development do not fulfil the requirements for future adoption by the Highway Authority then a management and maintenance of estate streets plan will be required and may be secured in a S106 Agreement for the development highways to remain privately maintained.
 
Road Safety Audits 
Where changes to the local highway network are proposed as a consequence of either the access arrangement (s278/s38 works) or off-site highway improvements (s278), in respect of a development scheme, Northumberland County Council requires the preliminary design to be the subject of a Stage 1 Road Safety Audit. This document accompanies the Transport Assessment and provides an independent assessment of the key design and operating arrangements of the highway works. Subsequent separate stages of Road Safety Audit will be undertaken should the scheme progress to detailed design and completion.
 
Development affecting the Strategic Road Network
For any development that has a potential impact in terms of trips and / or safety at the strategic road network, or by virtue of proximity, pre-application and scoping discussions need to be undertaken with National Highways. As a minimum National Highways require the trip impact at the strategic road network to be quantified, on an agreed basis, so that an informed decision can be made regarding the need for, and extent of, any further assessment. Further guidance is available from National Highways via their website and Northumberland County Council can provide information regarding the relevant representative for the region within National Highways.








 
Table Caption: Note 32. Town Centre Uses: Impact Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment for an application for retail / leisure uses on the impact of the proposal on the vitality and viability of existing centres. Required for:
Proposals that would add more than 1,000sqm gross retail floorspace beyond Town Centre boundaries in Smaller Town Centres: Amble, Bedlington and Haltwhistle, Ponteland and Prudhoe.
 
Proposals that would add more than 1,000sqm gross retail floorspace beyond Primary Shopping Area boundaries in Larger Town Centres: Alnwick, Ashington, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Blyth, Cramlington, Morpeth and Hexham.
 
Proposals for office uses that are more than 2500m2 additional gross floorspace outside the Town Centre in Morpeth.
 
Proposals for leisure-related buildings of 2,500sqm gross floorspace (not linked with wider open space activities) that are beyond defined Town Centre boundaries.

Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Prior Approval.
  • Proposals in accordance with the up-to-date Local Plan (you must include a statement that clearly demonstrates this).
To assess the impact of the proposal on the vitality of the existing centre.
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 90

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies TCS1, TCA2 and TCS 4.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans Alnwick and Denwick - Policy TCR3, Cramlington - Policy CNP12, Morpeth - Policy EMP1.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes an Impact Assessment or is a statement to explain why one is not required.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Town Centre Boundaries
  • Primary Shopping Areas
See guidance on ensuring the vitality of town centres on the National Planning Practice Guidance – Town centres and retail section and National Planning Policy Framework – section 7. The impact test will be specific to your proposal and should be carried out in parallel with the application.
 
Gross retail floorspace proposed is net retail plus areas used for storage and any staff / office areas that are clearly connected with the shop or store. In an old-fashioned shop, the area behind the counter would be part of 'gross' but not part of 'net'. Gross retail would NOT include any part of the same building that was not part of the proposed retail establishment, such as a flat above.









 
Table Caption: Note 33. Town Centre Uses: Sequential Assessment
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
An assessment for an application for 'main town centre' uses outside of an existing centre to demonstrate that there is no available land within an existing centre.
 
Main Town Centre uses include:
  • retail (including warehouse clubs and factory outlet centres);
  • leisure, entertainment and more intensive sport and recreation uses (including cinemas, restaurants, drive-through restaurants, bars, pubs, night-clubs, casinos, health and fitness centres, indoor bowling centres, and bingo halls);
  • offices; and
  • arts, culture, and tourism development (including theatres, museums, galleries, concert halls, hotels, and conference facilities).
Required for:
Proposals for 'main town centre uses' that are outside of a designated town centre or primary shopping area and incorporate 1000m2 or more external floor area or 1ha or more site area.
 
(Where the uses proposed are in accordance with the up-to-date Local Plan or are for small scale rural offices or other small scale rural development* we will accept a statement or pre-application response that demonstrates why no Sequential Assessment is required)
 
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Prior Approval.
To assess the impact of the proposal on the vitality of the existing centre.
 
National Policy 
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraphs 87-91

Northumberland Local Plan
Policies TCS 1, TCS 2 and TCS 4

Made Neighbourhood Plans
Alnwick and Denwick - Policy TCR3, Cramlington – Policy CNP12, Morpeth - Policy EMP1.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Sequential Assessment or a statement explaining that no Sequential Assessment is required.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Town Centre Boundaries
  • Primary Shopping Areas
*There will be a degree of judgement as to what constitutes "small scale rural", however it will normally include proposals below 150m2 gross floorspace located outside the built-up areas of the 12 main towns, as defined in the Local Plan.
 
It is for the applicant to demonstrate compliance with the sequential test. Failure to undertake an appropriate sequential assessment could in itself constitute a reason for refusing permission.
 
The sequential test will be specific to your proposal and should be carried out in parallel with the application. The Assessment should comply with the guidance in the National Planning Practice Guidance – Town centres and retail section (including paragraph 011) and National Planning Policy Framework – section 7. You are advised to appoint a professional to produce your Sequential Assessment.
 
Check whether your proposal is outside of a designated town centre / primary shopping area by looking at current planning policies on the NCC website.









 
Table Caption: Note 34. Tree Report/Plan
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Tree Plan:
A scaled plan showing affected trees to be removed and/or retained. This can be shown on the site plan(s) or on a separate plan.
 
It should clearly identify which trees/hedges are to be removed/pruned.
Required for:
Tree Works applications.

Householder Planning Permission and minor applications where:
  • there are protected trees (Tree Preservation Orders) on the site; and/or
  • the site is within a conservation area and there are trees on site*;
and these trees will need to be removed or pruned in order to carry out the proposal as identified by the applicant/ agent on ‘Trees and Hedges’ section of the 1APP application form.

Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission/minor applications outside conservations areas or with no TPO trees.
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition or not related to trees.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition not related to trees.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Prior Approval.
  • Changes of use with no external works.
Not required at validation for: 
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area
(may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.)
To demonstrate that sufficient space would be left to enable the tree to grow without detriment to the future occupiers of the development and to ensure that the construction phase of the development may be carried out without harming the trees.
 
Failure to submit the appropriate information will cause delays if the Case Officer needs to request this later.

Northumberland Local Plan
Policy QOP 4
Tree Report (also known as an Arboricultural Statement):
A report summarising the findings of any tree survey carried out on the site.
 
A suitably qualified and experienced Arboriculturalist should prepare this information.
Required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission/minor applications where there are trees on site subject to a Tree Preservation Order (TPO) and the Tree/Site Plan shows these TPO trees will need to be removed/pruned.
  • Major applications where the site includes trees.
  • Tree Works applications for trees protected by a Tree Preservation Order when your application relates to the condition of a tree or damage that it is causing*.
  • If requested on the pre-application advice response.
Not required for:
  • Householder Planning Permission including those in a conservation area (unless the works affect a TPO tree).
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Removal/Variation of a Condition or not related to trees.
  • Approval (Discharge) of Details Reserved by Condition not related to trees.
  • Consent to Display an Advertisement(s).
  • Prior Approval.
  • Applications where no groundworks/extension/change of access/substantial demolition are proposed. 
Not required at validation for: 
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Demolition in a Conservation Area
(may be requested by the Case Officer during consideration of the application.)
To ensure that all retained trees are not harmed by development.
 
Trees are vulnerable to damage during construction e.g. root/impact damage from construction traffic/ equipment, soil compaction or smothering caused by adding soil to the existing surface.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 131
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policy QOP 4
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document is/includes a Tree Report/Plan; and
  • ensure the Tree Report/Plan is no more than 12 months old.
Variations on the above requirements:
  • for applications for Tree Works the Tree Plan does not have to be to scale but will assist us if North is shown. Clearly identify where the trees are in relation to their surroundings;
  • *For applications for Tree Works the Tree Report can be provided in the form of a written statement on the form or within a separate document as appropriate. A full Arboricultural Assessment (tree report) is not required for validation as long as the statement has been obtained from an Arboriculturist or appropriate expert e.g. Tree Surgeon.
How to prepare / further guidance
Check our Planning Constraints Map for:
  • Conservation Areas
We currently don't have a map showing Tree Preservation Orders online. How to find out if your tree is protected.

Tree Report
Ensure a suitably qualified and experienced arboriculturist prepares this information in accordance with BS 5837:2012 Trees in relation to design, demolition and construction: Recommendations and BS 3998:2010 Tree work: Recommendations. Suitably qualified arboriculturists are often members of the Arboricultural Association or the Institute of Chartered Foresters.
Table Caption: Note 35. Ventilation/Extraction Details
What is it? When is it needed? Why is it needed?
Details of the position and design of ventilation and extraction equipment. This may include a technical specification with an acoustic assessment of the extraction system, noise mitigation measures and odour abatement techniques where required.   Required for:
  • Proposals that require ventilation or extraction systems (e.g. hot food takeaway, restaurant uses, and launderettes).
Not required for:
  • Lawful Development Certificates.
  • Listed Building Consent.
  • Prior Approval.
To ensure ventilation and extraction has been implemented in a safe and appropriate way to protect residential amenity.
 
National Policy
National Planning Policy Framework – paragraph 185
 
National Planning Practice Guidance – Noise section
 
Northumberland Local Plan
Policies STP5, TCS6 and QOP5.
 
Made Neighbourhood Plans Allendale - Policy ADNP1, Alnwick and Denwick - Policies H2 and E5, Cramlington - Policies CNP1 and CNP25, Embleton - Policy 4, Hexham - Policy HNP4, Lesbury -  Policy 3, Longhorsley - Policy LNP4, Morpeth - Policy Des1, North Northumberland Coast Neighbourhood Plan - Policies 5, 16 and 18, Ponteland -  Policies PNP1 and PNP2, Stannington - Policy 10, Thirston -  Policy 1, Whittington - Policy WNP3, Wooler - Policy 2.
What criteria must it meet to be valid?
  • the title must state the document includes ventilation/extraction details; and
  • ensure the details supplied are no more than 12 months old and are more up to date if the scheme or other impacts on the development have changed significantly since the report was produced.
How to prepare / further guidance
Existing and proposed elevation drawings showing the size, location and external appearance of plant and equipment will be required, drawn to a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 (in line with Note 8).
 
Include a technical specification and an acoustic assessment of the extraction system, noise mitigation measures and odour abatement techniques where required. The technical specification must be specific to the development or it may be rejected.
 
Refer to EMAQ Control of Odour and Noise from Commercial Kitchen Exhaust Systems and National Planning Practice Guidance.









 
If, after reading this information you are uncertain what documents you are required to submit please use our Pre-application service so we can advise you further. This service can save you time and money and help reduce invalid applications. We can tell you whether permission is needed for your proposal, what type of consent is needed and what documents you need to submit. A fee is payable for this service. 

If you are unsure how to provide drawings/reports yourself and require someone to make the application on your behalf you can appoint a professional planning consultant. If a consultant (agent) is named on the form all communication will go directly to them. To find an approved Planning Consultant search the RTPI Directory

For major development and other schemes which are likely to have significant impacts on the surrounding area, applicants are encouraged to engage in pre-application discussions so that they are clear about the information that we will need to understand the impacts of the application and to avoid abortive work or invalid applications. Furthermore, pre-application scoping with other relevant statutory consultees and stakeholders is advised. 

The Gov.uk website explains more about national information requirements and what happens if an applicant disagrees with the local planning authority request to provide additional information (such as local requirements).
The application form, fee and accompanying information should all be submitted at the same time.

The information you submit will be made publicly available (from the date the application is valid) on our website via the Public Access Planning Register. For further detail view our Planning Application Privacy Notice. We recommend removing personal information about yourself and others or handwritten signatures, from supporting documents before uploading files, a typed signature is acceptable.

Our preferred way of accepting applications and associated documents is online using the Planning Portal website. Get help choosing and completing the form online, upload one copy of your documents and save and return to your application at any time. The Planning Portal will help you work out the fee and any exemptions or reductions, which must be paid directly to the Portal. Guidance is provided at every step. As soon as you submit your application you will receive a Portal reference number. The application and fee will be passed to us to process electronically. If you have any queries about their online system please read the Portal Frequently Asked Questions.

Submit your application on the Planning Portal

Other ways to apply / find an application form
If you do not wish to apply on the Planning Portal use the Paper Application Form Chooser to print a form then pay for your planning application on our website. Email one colour copy of your application form and required documents to planning@northumberland.gov.uk (include your payment reference number).

File size and type

  • The largest file size we can receive per email is 25mb, if your submission exceeds this (or the Planning Portal limits) you can submit documents via Cryptshare. This is a secure way of sending larger/multiple documents to us (up to 5GB). The password you create must be emailed to us, so we are able to log in and retrieve the documents.  
  • Our security system prevents us from being able to access documents on CD or on USB memory sticks or via links such as We Transfer etc. 
  • We cannot accept eml files or web links to online documents etc.
The following explains the validation process we follow when we receive an application and what communication you can expect from us.

When an application has been submitted our Validation Team will check it against the Validation Checklist and any constraints at the site and will respond (usually within 7 working days of receipt):
  • If the requirements are not addressed, there are discrepancies in plans, missing information or the fee is unpaid the application will be considered ‘invalid’. We will notify you and set out the reasons why. Your application will be delayed until you provide the information and failure to provide the information within the timescale (21 days) will result in your application being returned (any fee will be refunded). 
  • If applicants properly address the requirements of the checklist the application will be considered ‘valid’ and will be registered from this date. Once the application is valid you will receive an acknowledgement letter to say it is valid. The letter will supply your application reference number (please quote this in all correspondence) and the expected decision date.
  • The timescale we have to decide your application (e.g. 8 weeks for householder applications) will start from the valid date and not the date you submit the application (unless it is complete when received). The application will be allocated to a Planning Case Officer for consideration usually within 7 working days from the valid date. Check the Public Access Planning Register after this time to see which Planning Officer the application has been assigned to. If a site visit or further information is needed the Case Officer will be in touch.
All communications will go to the agent named on the application form. If no agent is named we will communicate with the applicant. If no email address is provided we will respond by post. Please check emails (and your spam folder) regularly and respond as soon as possible to avoid delay. 

To allow a Planning Case Officer to focus on the assessment and processing of applications, we would ask that you only contact them when necessary. Find information on key dates for your application using the important dates tab for your application record on the Public Access Planning Register where you can also read the responses from anyone we consult, including any comments submitted. The decision will be sent to the agent (or applicant if no agent) when complete and made available on Public Access. Read more about the planning consultation/decision making process.