Care & support for adults

Care & support for adults

This page describes how we arrange support for people who have a disability or a long-term illness, and how we aim to make sure people are in control of their own support arrangements.

Contact adult social care

Contacting adult social care.

All adult social care services in Northumberland can be contacted through our Single Point of Access:

Care & support for adults

"Social care" support for ill or disabled adults in Northumberland is operated by Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust in partnership with the county council.

Support for working-age adults with mental health problems is operated by the Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, under a separate partnership.

In this section you can find an introduction to the way we arrange support and a series of information sheets. There are also links to useful information produced elsewhere.

New legislation came into force from April 2015, which brings some changes to the way care and support for adults is organised. Click here for further information about the Care Act 2014.

'Self-directed support': what support is available?
People’s lives shouldn’t have to stop because they are disabled or have a long-term illness. We aim to make sure people can get the support they need to enable them to continue to live in the way they want.

We offer two kinds of support arrangement:
  • crisis support for people who urgently need help after a health crisis or a serious accident
  • self-directed support for people with longer-term support needs
Crisis support focuses on making sure people’s immediate needs are met, helping them to recover and to become independent. Many people only need crisis support.

Self-directed support aims to put people in charge of their own support arrangements. People are offered a personal budget which they are encouraged to manage themselves, or with help from family and friends. We can also make arrangements on people's behalf.

We set the amount of the personal budget based on a shared assessment. Personal budgets can be used flexibly to overcome obstacles to living the way you want caused by illness or disability. For instance:
  • If you need support with day-to-day tasks or if you need someone to be on hand to make sure you are safe, you can use a personal budget to employ someone or to make arrangements so people you know can help you.
  • If you need support to take part in social, leisure or educational activities, you can use a personal budget to arrange that.
  • If family members or friends who usually provide you with support need a break, you can use a personal budget to make whatever arrangements are necessary.
You will need to agree a support plan with us, setting out how you will use your personal budget. We will check this is safe and legal. We can help you to draw up support plans, or if you want you can do it yourself.

We will review your personal budget and your support plan at intervals to check whether any changes are needed.

If your disability or illness does not cause you any problems in critical areas of life, you may not be eligible for a personal budget. We may still be able to give you advice about services and equipment which might help you and about other possibilities such as adaptations to your home.

If your disability or illness is so serious you cannot realistically stay in your own home, we can help you to move into supported housing or a care home.

We keep information about people we arrange help for in our files and on computer records. This information is shared with other people who need to know it to make arrangements for your support, but is otherwise kept strictly confidential.

Ask any of our staff if you want to know what information is being held, or if you would like some information not to be shared.
How much might I have to pay?
Most people have to pay towards the cost of their care and support services, but people would not be expected to pay more than they can afford based on their income and savings. The amount will depend on your financial circumstances.

Some people will be assessed as being able to pay all the costs of their care and support themselves but we will still offer help and advice if they want it. As a general guide, as of April 2016 people with savings of more than £23,250* were expected to pay the maximum charge, and pensions and other income were also taken into account. More information about charges is given in our information sheets below.

*Please check information sheet C8 on paying for care and support for the latest information on charges for support if you are living at home, or information sheet C9 for charges for people living in a care home.
Our information sheets
The list of information sheets which are currently available or in preparation is below. We are adding these to this page as they are completed.

Please send us an email to: Socialcare@northumbria.nhs.uk if you would like copies of any of these information sheets in another format, such as tape or Braille, or if you would like them translated into another language.

The sheets with an asterix (*) next to them are those which we now aim to give to everyone when they first ask us for support.

Information sheet C1* - advice and needs assessment
  • PDF standard
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C2* - what we ask about in a needs assessment
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C3* - your entitlement to care and support
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C4* - advice, assessment and support for carers
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C5* - capping the cost of care and support
  • This information sheet was about the Government's plans to "cap" the cost of care and support services, to limit the financial risk to people who need a high level of care and support.  These plans were scheduled to be introduced from April 2016, but the Government announced in July 2015 that they will not now be implemented until April 2020.  This information sheet has therefore been withdrawn.
Information sheet C6* - care and support planning
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C8* - paying for care and support (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C9* - charges for living in a care home (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C10* - communicating with us by email
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C11* - NHS Continuing Healthcare (CHC)
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet C12* - complaints, comments and compliments Information sheet S4* - safeguarding adults
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 7 - care in your own home
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 8 - help with moving into a care home
Documents to follow

Information sheet 9 - living in a care home: your rights
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 11 - person-centred planning for people with a learning disability Information sheet 12 - disability equipment
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 13 - adaptations to your home
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 14 - direct payments
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 15 - seeing a financial assessment and benefits officer (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017 Information sheet 16 - paying for support in the community (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 17 - reclaiming charges for breaks in services (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 19 - maximum charges for community support (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 20 - charges for a short stay in a care home (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 24 - smoke free environment
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF(large print)
Information sheet 29 - making allowance for the cost of disability (from 10 April 2017)
  • PDF (Standard)
  • PDF (Large print)
Archived sheets - 11 April 2016 to 9 April 2017
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Information sheet 30 - closure of the independent living fund
  • PDF (standard)
  • PDF (large print)
Notes for care managers and support staff: Each service user should be provided with a folder containing as many of the above information sheets as are relevant to their circumstances at the time of their initial assessment. The basic set of sheets which should always be included is those marked by asterisks..
Information about care homes
Care homes provide care, accommodation and board for people who need a high level of support. They are required by law to be registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

People who live in Northumberland and need this level of care can get financial support from the county council, through its partnership with Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, if they are not able to afford the fees themselves. A complete list of registered care homes in England is available on the CQC website, which also holds inspection reports providing detailed information about the services offered by each home and the quality of what is provided.
Support for carers
Additional Northumberland information
Get involved and have your say
Information about how to get involved in helping shape services through one of the service user forums across Northumberland is available by clicking here.

Northumberland Golden Guide
Northumberland Golden Guide contains comprehensive information about services and support for older people in Northumberland, produced in association with Northumberland Council, Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, Age UK, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust and ISOS.

Northumberland Life
Northumberland Life is a local web-based directory of groups and services in and around Northumberland. It is valuable for anyone who wants to know what Northumberland's communities can offer, from parents looking for activities for young children to older people looking for like-minded groups; from people who want to take up new activities to people who want to make contact with others affected by the same disability or illness.

The National Careline
The National Careline is a not-for-profit company offering information about care and support for older people, their carers and their families. It aims to fill the information and advice gap for older people and their relatives who are seeking to find their way through the care maze. The National Careline also provides a wealth of extra information users may find beneficial in their support and care of the older person.
 

Care Quality Commission-registered services

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors, inspects and regulates CQC registered services to make sure they meet fundamental standards of quality and safety and publish what they find, including performance ratings to help people choose care.

The ratings are divided into five categories, with an overall rating for each service. Northumberland County Council provides nine services which are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). CQC have this year introduced a new rating system which includes rating for five categories and an overall rating for the service.

To date, not all of our services have experienced this new CQC inspection process, however all our services have consistently received positive outcomes in previous inspections. We welcome the CQC’s reports and the contribution this makes to our ongoing improvement of our services.

Where our performance falls below our own and the CQC’s high standards an action plan is introduced and effective monitoring procedures put in place to bring those areas up to the expected standard.
 

Service name: Chibburn Court
Address: 10 Chibburn Court, Widdrington, Northumberland, NE61 5QT

Chibburn Court supports residential care to people with learning disabilities for three adults with learning disabilities. The service is provided in a large adapted bungalow within its own grounds located within a quiet residential cul-de-sac.

Staff provide 24 hour care seven days a week. Each service user has an individual support plan and support includes assistance with personal care, daily living skills and activities as well as ongoing support from health and social care services.

The staff team provide physical and emotional support to service users whilst carrying out, with service users, a number of domestic type duties such as cleaning, laundry, shopping and cooking. Staff support service users to engage in social and community activities they have expressed an interest in.




Service name: Homecare North (Berwick)
Address: Council Offices, Wallace Green, Berwick upon Tweed, TD15 1ED
 
The Short Term Support Service provides care and rehabilitation in people’s homes for patients in Northumberland following a serious accident or illness; or a short period of personal care and practical support for people with cancer or a life limiting illness and their families.

The aim is to help people live independently and safely. The service focuses on things which are important to the service user with an emphasis on trying to help them regain skills and confidence.

The service can provide a rehabilitation programme led by a physiotherapist or occupational therapist; help with tasks such as washing, dressing or meal preparation; and equipment or minor adaptations to people’s homes to help them live safely and independently. The CQC inspects this service by geographical area. Below are ratings for the service in the Berwick area.

Service name: North Locality Homecare (Alnwick)
Address: 3 Linnet Court, Hawfinch Drive, Cawledge Park, Alnwick, NE22 2GD

The Short Term Support Service provides care and rehabilitation in people’s homes for patients in Northumberland following a serious accident or illness; or a short period of personal care and practical support for people with cancer or a life limiting illness and their families.

The aim is to help people live independently and safely. The service focuses on things which are important to the service user with an emphasis on trying to help them regain skills and confidence.

The service can provide a rehabilitation programme led by a physiotherapist or occupational therapist; help with tasks such as washing, dressing or meal preparation; and equipment or minor adaptations to people’s homes to help them live safely and independently. The CQC inspects this service by geographical area. Below are ratings for the service in the Alnwick area.

Service name: Northumberland Supported Living
Address: Sea Lodge, Beach Road, Morpeth, Northumberland, NE61 5LF

Northumberland Supported Living Service provides an independent supported living service at Sea Lodge for two adults with learning disabilities. Service users have secured tenancy agreements and live in a large adapted bungalow within its own grounds with private beach in Cresswell.

As well as assisting the clients with personal daily living activities the staff team carry out all the housekeeping duties including cleaning, laundry, shopping and cooking. Service users have their own personal individual mobility cars and staff support them to access community activities and services they enjoy.

Service name: Shared Lives Northumberland
Address: County Hall, Floor 2, Block 2, Morpeth, Northumberland, NE61 2EF

Shared Lives Northumberland provides support in a family home for adults who are unable to live alone. The service and team of five staff is based at County Hall, Morpeth and supports approximately 45 service users with learning, physical or health related disabilities and their carers across Northumberland.

Most service users do not need residential care but are unable to live without consistent and reliable support from someone who knows them. Living in someone’s home provides a better quality and more appropriate lifestyle for the person.

Service name: South East Sector Home Care
Address: The Harbour Suite, Blyth Community Hospital, Thoroton Street, Blyth NE24 1DX
 
The Short Term Support Service provides care and rehabilitation in people’s homes for patients in Northumberland following a serious accident or illness; or a short period of personal care and practical support for people with cancer or a life limiting illness and their families.

The aim is to help people live independently and safely. The service focuses on things which are important to the service user with an emphasis on trying to help them regain skills and confidence.

The service can provide a rehabilitation programme led by a physiotherapist or occupational therapist; help with tasks such as washing, dressing or meal preparation; and equipment or minor adaptations to people’s homes to help them live safely and independently. The CQC inspects this service by geographical area. Below are ratings for the service in central and south Northumberland.

Service name: Tynedale House
Address: Tynedale Drive, Cowpen, Blyth, Northumberland, NE24 4LH

Tynedale House offers long-term residential accommodation and short-term respite care for adults with learning disabilities. The residential service provides personal care and support through individual support plans and ongoing support from Health and Social care services.

The service also works closely with other providers of care delivering support on a one-to-one basis to users on site. The respite service provides short-term care for adults with learning disabilities to support the well-being of the carer and the person who is being cared for.

Stays can be as short or as long as needed. Respite can also provide parents and families with a necessary and valuable break from caring responsibilities.

Service name: Wansbeck Supported Living Service
Address: 2, Hatfield Chase, Bedlington, Northumberland, NE22 5LB

Wansbeck Supported Living Service offers an independent supported living domiciliary service for adults with learning disabilities within their own homes. The service is provided within their own purpose built bungalows, and clients have their own tenancy agreements with the local housing association Bernicia.

Staff provide 24-hour support seven days a week including supporting service users’ with personal care, encouraging independence and social and psychological support with daily living skills.

The service assists and helps support service users to be valued and included in their communities; to access community facilities and social and leisure activities; to access resources; to remain safe within their home environment and to develop the necessary skills to support independence and achieve their individual choices and personal aspirations.

Service name: West Locality Home Care (West)
Address: Dene Park House, Corbridge Road, Hexham, NE46 1HN
 
The Short Term Support Service provides care and rehabilitation in people’s homes for patients in Northumberland following a serious accident or illness; or a short period of personal care and practical support for people with cancer or a life limiting illness and their families.

The aim is to help people live independently and safely. The service focuses on things which are important to the service user with an emphasis on trying to help them regain skills and confidence.

The service can provide a rehabilitation programme led by a physiotherapist or occupational therapist; help with tasks such as washing, dressing or meal preparation; and equipment or minor adaptations to people’s homes to help them live safely and independently. The CQC inspects this service by geographical area. Below are ratings for the service in west Northumberland.

Shared lives

Shared Lives Northumberland provides supported accommodation in family houses for adults who have a disability, mental health problem, or people who are unable to live independently due to age.

The scheme enables adults to share family and community life.

Home care

Home care services can provide many different kinds of support to people with an illness or disability. Usually they provide support in the person's own home.

If you think you or someone you know needs home care, you should contact our care management service. There may be a charge for home care, depending on your financial circumstances.

Registered home care organisations
A list of all registered home care organisations operating in Northumberland is available on the website of the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Many of these organisations have contracts with the council and can provide services arranged by care managers. They can usually also offer help under a private arrangement.
Contact adult social care
Adult social Care contact. Listed below

Day care for adults

This section gives you information about day care services provided by the county council for adults with a disability or illness.

Day care services
Adult Social Care: Contact us - Tel: 01670 536 400 and EMail: socialcare@northumbria.nhs.uk
  • Access to day care services (and to day care provided by other bodies) can be arranged for people who need it through the care management service.
County council day care for older people
The council's day care centres provide specialist services for older people with dementia in southeast Northumberland. Similar services, operated by voluntary organisations, are available in other parts of the county.

Essendene Day Service
Tynedale House
Tynedale Drive
Blyth
NE24 4LH
  • Tel: (01670) 364 660
  • Fax Number
Additional services: 17 day care places from Mon to Friday - 10 day care places from Saturday to Sunday
County council day services for people with a learning disability
There are a number of day services for people with learning disabilities across the county. These services are managed by Northumbria Healthcare Foundation Trust under an agreement with the county council.


Mowbray Day Centre
Stakeford Lane
Stakeford
Choppington 
Northumberland
NE625HQ
Contact tel          
•    Tel: (01670 536230)
•   Show Map 
Additional services: 40 day care places from Mon to Friday - 


Blyth Riverside Resource Centre
Coniston Road
Blyth Riverside Business Park
Blyth
NE24 4RQ
  • Tel: (01670) 353 276
  • Fax: (01670) 353 495
  • show map
Horticultural Skills Unit
Hepscott Park
Stannington
Morpeth
NE61 6NF The Garden Cafe
Hepscott Park
Stannington
Morpeth
NE61 6NF Horticultural Training Unit
West Sleekburn Farm
Bomarsund
Bedlington
NE22 7AD The Northstar Centre
St Mary's
Castlegate
Berwick
TD15 1JX The Pottergate Centre
Howling Lane
Alnwick
NE66 1DJ
  • Tel: (01665) 602 181
  • Fax: (01665) 605 378
  • show map
The Tynedale Centre
Unit 13
Haugh Lane Industrial Estate
Hexham
NE46 3PU
  • Tel: (01434) 605 245
  • Fax: (01434) 609 021
  • show map
Tynedale Horticultural Service
The Lodge
Ridley Hall
Bardon Mill
Hexham
NE47 7BP
Contact adult social care
Adult social Care contact. Listed below

Care homes

Here you will find information about care homes for people who need a high level of support.

Care homes in Northumberland for older people
We want people to maintain their independence and stay in their own homes as long as possible. However, for people whose disability or illness is so serious they cannot stay in their own homes, moving into a care home may be an option. 

Care homes provide care, accommodation and board for people needing high levels of support. They are required by law to be registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

People living in Northumberland who need this level of care can get financial support from the county council if they are not able to afford the fees themselves. If you live in the county and need support, we are responsible for arranging this even if you prefer to move to a care home somewhere else.
Assessment of care homes
We visit care homes each year to see how well they meet quality standards. Homes shown in the list as band one met our standards very well when we visited in 2016; homes in band four met the standards least well. 

However, all homes on this list taking new residents provide at least an acceptable quality of service and you may wish to choose a home which scored less well.

Occasionally, a home has temporary problems, which means it cannot guarantee a good service for new residents. We indicate this on the list as “currently not taking new residents” where it applies.

Since our visit, homes may have corrected problems which we found, so treat the bandings as a general guide. 

We pay higher fees for higher quality – so if you will be paying us the full cost of your place, band one homes will cost you most, and band four homes least.
Contact adult social care
Adult social Care contact. Listed below

Residential care to supported living

The council has developed a process for deregistering residential care homes and moving to independent supported living where all or most of the residents remain on site.

Moving to supported living
The sense of security and independence that comes with taking on your own tenancy can help people feel more stable and confident about the future. It can also allow people more freedom of choice about their living environment and make better use of their income.

A number of current registered residential services might now consider the potential benefits of independent supported living and will benefit from further information to inform any decision to change their status.

The protocol document below supports a person-centred approach and the eight step individual pathway. This also includes good practice guides and resources to assist you through the process.

If you are considering this option, please contact us before you progress by emailing us at:
Resources
The eight step process
Step one is developing the business case and introducing the change to residents and families. Step two is the decision to stay and developing the person-centred plan. Step three is re-assessment of needs for supported living and assessment of care hours required. Step four is identify what funding and benefits are available to residents. Step five is developing and understanding the tenancy. Step six is agreeing the staffing resource. Step seven is when the service changes over and the new support package starts.
Step eight reviews the changes.

Social services - direct payments

Direct payments are made to people who require support at home, day care, short breaks or special equipment and who wish to organise these services themselves.

Adult Social care contact informationUnder our direct payments scheme, we pay you the cost of the service and you can then make your own arrangements.

Is self-directed support & personal budgets just direct payments in another name?
A personal budget is how much money you are eligible to receive to pay for your support, based on the new system called self-directed support. It is calculated based on an assessment of your needs.

Direct payments are just one way in which people can be given their personal budget.
Who can use direct payments?
Anyone aged 16 or over, assessed by a care manager as needing community care, has a right to opt for direct payments, though there are a few restrictions:
  • You must be willing and able to manage the paperwork and responsibilities involved (with someone helping if necessary).
  • You may not be eligible if you have been detained under mental health legislation.
Carers can only get direct payments to replace services provided directly to them. They can’t get money to buy services for the person they care for.
What can direct payments be used for?
Direct payments can be used to pay for:
  • personal assistance (e.g. help from an agency)
  • daytime care, short breaks or special equipment
They can not be used to pay for:
  • general living expenses (e.g. fuel bills)
  • health or housing services
  • services provided by a public-sector organisation
  • long-term residential care
  • your live-in partner or relative 
How much would the direct payment be?
Direct payments are based on the amount and type of care you need. This is assessed by a care manager.
You can choose to receive direct payments for all your care, or only for some parts of it.

We will agree a reasonable cost for the care, including money for recruiting staff, insurance, wages and other costs such as national insurance, holiday, sickness and maternity pay. Usually this will be based on an hourly rate for the care needed.

We cannot pay more than it would cost if we arranged the service ourselves.

We will assess how much you can afford to pay yourself towards the cost of your support, using the same rules that apply to charges for services. You either pay this separately or have it subtracted from your direct payments.
What would my responsibilities be?
If you choose direct payments, you will have to:
  • open a separate bank account specifically to use for your direct payment
  • use the money to pay for the help your community care assessment shows you need
  • keep records of how the money is used
  • be accountable for the way the money is spent
  • be responsible for arranging your own care (including back up arrangements)
  • take on the responsibilities of an employer if you employ your own staff
Can I get help managing direct payments?
The person receiving direct payment must be able to make decisions about the support they buy in, but they can get help with the day-to-day management of things like paperwork. This can come from us, from family or friends, or through legal arrangements like a trust or power of attorney.

For instance, you may want help with:
  • how to recruit and select personal assistants
  • how to write job descriptions and contracts
  • how to become an employer
  • how to deal with tax and national insurance 
What monitoring & review would there be?
You will continue to have a care manager, who reviews your circumstances regularly. If your needs have changed, or if the rules about how much support we can provide have changed, this may lead to an increase or reduction in payments.

We would also do an annual check on how you are using the money and what services you have arranged.
Further practical information
Direct payments will not affect your social security benefits or tax liabilities.

You can ask at any time to stop getting direct payments and change to services arranged by us. If your needs are complex, we will need some notice to sort this out.
Social service - contact information
To find out more, talk to your care manager, or contact:

Self Directed Support Team
Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
Merley Croft
Loansdean
Morpeth
NE61 2DL
Adult social care

Charges for social care

Find out more about charges for social care here.

Charges for services
There are charges for most social care services, though normally we assess each person's financial situation to decide what they can afford to pay. These charges are set by Northumberland County Council and administered by Northumberland Care Trust.
Social care charges - contact us
If you have questions about your charges which are not answered in the information sheets and if your care manager cannot help you, please contact our charges helpline on (01670) 622891 or write to:

Finance Section 
Social Care Directorate
Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
County Hall
Morpeth
Northumberland
NE61 2EF

Carers

Here you will find information and advice for carers of adults with a long-term illness or disability.

Am I a carer?
You are a carer if you provide unpaid help to someone who depends upon you because of:
  • frailty
  • mental or physical health problems
  • illness or drug/alcohol misuse
You may not live in the same house and you don’t have to be related to the person you care for.

This section provides information to carers of adults who want to know how to ask for an assessment of their own needs.
  • Parents caring for children with special needs should contact the family support team.
  • For information on how the needs of the person you care for can be assessed, go to social care support.
Carer’s assessment
You have a right to advice and a ‘carer’s assessment’ of your own needs. You don't have to be providing a lot of care to be entitled to help. You can have a carer’s assessment even if the person you care for hasn't had an assessment themselves. Alternatively, if you and the person you care for prefer, we can assess both your needs at the same time. This is known as a combined assessment.

A carer’s assessment is a detailed discussion with a trained member of staff, which will produce a statement of what your needs are, what you can do to reduce them or prevent them from getting worse. If caring is having a significant impact on your wellbeing, the assessment may suggest you are entitled to support.

You don’t have to have a carer’s assessment to get advice about available support. The countywide organisation Carers Northumberland, a charity partly funded by the council, can provide advice and support with a wide range of issues. It can also put you in touch with other people in a similar situation.
  • Carers Northumberland can also talk to you about whether having a carer’s assessment would be helpful to you.
If the person who you are providing care and support to is having a needs assessment themselves you will need to be involved in this assessment. We recommend you also have a carer’s assessment. We can then make sure you have the help and information you need to look after your own health and wellbeing, and ensure we take account of your needs when planning how to meet theirs. Find out more here. If you have had an assessment but either your needs or the needs of the person you care for have changed, you should contact the care manager again to request a review.
Useful contacts for carers
Contact us You can also contact the care manager of the person you care for.

Our carers’ guide and strategy
Northumberland family and friends carers' guide (currently under review) explains the types of help and support you need as a carer and how to access it. It also explains in detail how a needs assessment can help you and makes suggestions about how to prepare for it.

For further information, please contact Carers Northumberland or Michele O'Brien (carers and partnerships manager) on:

Carers’ wellbeing checklist
Northumberland carers’ health and wellbeing checklist aims to help you think about your own health, how your role affects your life and to consider things you can change. The purpose of the wellbeing check is to help you access health interventions and to continue caring safely, without your own health suffering.

  • Ask your care manager, Carers Northumberland or any professional you work with for a hard copy or contact 01670 629 028.

Carers Northumberland
Carers Northumberland is a support service for carers in Northumberland. It works in partnership with other agencies to offer a one-stop information service to carers, support groups, short break opportunities and events.

Carers Northumberland have also produced a number of other leaflets:
Carer FAQs
What support is there for carers in Northumberland?
Support for carers is available through the care management service and Carers Northumberland. To access this service, contact us on 01670 536 400 or contact the care manager of the person you care for, or call Carers Northumberland on 01670 320 025.

What help can I get if I am caring and working?
Combining paid work and caring can be difficult, and there is a growing recognition of the support needs of working carers. Taking on caring should not mean you have to give up work. A carer’s assessment should take into account a carer's wish to work.  What benefits can I receive as a carer?
There are a range of benefits, tax credits and other financial support you may be able to receive as a carer. To find out which benefits you could be eligible for as a carer, visit Gov.uk or talk to us on 01670 536 400. You can also ask the care manager of the person you care for or ring Carers Northumberland on 01670 320 025.

What is a carer’s allowance?
Carer's allowance is a benefit that may be paid to carers of working age who provide more than 35 hours of care a week. Entitlement is linked to the benefits paid to the person being cared for. However, you don't have to be related to, or live with, the person you care for.  What is a carer’s assessment?
If you provide a lot of care regularly to a relative or friend and your role is having an impact on your life, you have the right to ask for a carer’s assessment. A carer's assessment is your opportunity to tell social care about what could make caring easier for you. You can discuss help you need to maintain your own health and to balance caring with other aspects of your life, like work and family.

You also have a right to an assessment if:
  • you intend to look after someone
  • you are caring for a disabled child (your needs as a carer will be considered as part of the needs of your child)
The services that might be provided to carers include:
  • substitute care to enable you to have a break from your caring role
  • support with particular tasks or equipment to help you care
  • advice and support in your role as a carer
  • benefits information and advice
I need a break from my caring responsibilities. Is there any help available to me?
If the person you care for has a care manager, speak to them about short-break care arrangements. A carer’s assessment helps identify what breaks you need and how these will be arranged.

Carers Northumberland can also offer small grants through the carers support fund to help you fund a short break for yourself, if your family’s financial position means this would be difficult otherwise.

End of life care (palliative care) in Northumberland

Palliative care services in Northumberland are delivered by Northumbria Healthcare NHS Trust.

Services have undergone a radical transformation in recent years, with significant investment to ensure the service meets the needs of the population it serves.

In 2009, a 19-bed palliative care inpatient unit opened within North Tyneside Hospital, the first in the country.  This proved very successful and the trust opened a similar unit in Wansbeck Hospital in 2011. 

In 2011, community palliative care services and consultant services became part of the trust, enabling all specialist palliative care services to come under one umbrella for the first time.

These have been crucial steps to enable the realisation of a vision to deliver a fully integrated community, inpatient and hospital palliative care service close to people’s homes. 
 
Northumbria Healthcare NHS Trust runs the largest integrated palliative care service in the country, covering a population of 500,000 people over a large geographical area.

We look after patients in their homes, care homes, hospital wards or in our own specialist inpatient units. 

Palliative care seeks to address the physical and emotional needs of people with life-threatening illnesses, to enable them to lead the fullest life that they can.

Service aims
The Northumbria palliative care service aims:
  • to identify all patients with palliative care needs and ensure those needs are met through direct care, advice, information and education
  • to provide a comprehensive, “joined up” palliative care service to patients and their families in all settings with the service working seamlessly between hospital and community provision
  • to deliver planned and anticipatory care, as well as emergency and unplanned care 24 hours a day, seven days a week
  • to enable patients to stay in their place of choice by offering emotional and practical support for carers and family members as well as providing specialist input where needed
  • to deliver excellence in all aspects of care with a commitment to service innovation, measurement of quality and continuous improvement
  • to improve patient outcomes and experience by ensuring that all providers work to shared objectives, and to consistent care and quality standards
Service performance
Hospital admissions in the last 100 days of life
Admissions to hospital in the last 100  days of life Acute and community bed days per death Acute bed days per death
14/15 baseline 8.8 7.1
15/16 Q1 8.4 6.6
15/16 Q2 7.7 6.2
15/16 Q3 7.0 5.7
15/16 to date 7.7 6.1
 
These figures show the number of days spent in hospital by patients in Northumberland in their last 100 days of life – for 2015/16. Admissions to both acute and community hospital has shown a downward trend. (Source: Northumbria Healthcare |NHS Foundation Trust Information Services – Analysis and reporting 17 February 2016.)
  
Patients’ preferred v. actual place of death 
Patients’ preferred place of death against actual place of death:  1 August 2015 – 13 January 2016
Patients known to the palliative care unit* who have died 607
Patients known to the palliative care unit who died in hospital 87
Patients known to the palliative care unit who died in hospital with a preferred place of death recorded 40
Patients known to the palliative care unit who died in hospital with a preferred place of death recorded as hospital/hospice/question not appropriate\possible 28
Palliative care unit patients who have died in hospital with a preferred place of death recorded 46%
 
Palliative care unit patients who have died in hospital with their preferred place of death achieved 70%
 
 
Note
*The palliative care unit went live August 2015

Commissioning plans & market position statements

This page lists our plans for supporting disabled adults and those with a long-term illness, and the changes we would like to see in the local market for provision of social care services.

Commissioning plans
We have produced a series of joint strategic commissioning plans that set out our overall intentions for the main groups of adults with support needs arising from disabilities or long-term illness. The plans cover: The plans are shared between Northumberland Care Trust, Northumberland County Council and the Northumberland Clinical Commissioning Group.
Market position statements
Market Position Statements (and the relationships which support them) help influence the choice and quality of services on offer – and ensure that their supply has the capacity to meet demand and respond sustainably to anticipated changes. 

They also help deliver the local authority duty to shape the market in adult care and support introduced by the Care Act 2014. 

The four 2015 statements have been combined into a single document, a Market Position Statement for Care and Support in Northumberland.  This avoids unnecessarily repeating messages which are common to different client groups; it sets out more clearly our understanding of the local market and our ambitions for working with it to change.  The new format is also more in line with changes in service delivery towards generic working and reflects more closely a personalised approach tailored to individual needs rather than broader more institutional categories.

Although the body of the document brings together the different groups, separate sections dealing with particular issues and key messages for the four groups are presented more prominently earlier in the document.

Our 2016 Statement should be seen alongside:
  • Information available as part of the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (the “Health and Wellbeing Assessment” on the council’s website);
  • The Joint Strategic Commissioning Plans for the different needs groups included above; 
  • Partnership groups, user and carer forums and provider forums; information from our customer feedback about performance; and liaison with statutory regulators - that is collected and reported in a number of different locations.
  • Work on quality in different contexts, including the Quality Weighted Payments Scheme and its associated standards, the work of the council’s contract monitoring staff and their liaison with the statutory regulators.
Although some of the text (e.g. information about legal changes) is no longer current, much of the 2015 Statements remain relevant and they are included below as useful background information.  Documents for the four groups covered can be accessed using the following links: The statements cover for each group:
  • the supply of services and the demand for them
  • future resources for council-commissioned services
  • key messages from policy
  • what we know about users and providers
  • the priorities for developing new services

Ageing Well in Northumberland

This section gives you information about services and support to help keep people active, connected and well.

What is Ageing Well?
Ageing Well is a positive approach to planning and working with local people to ensure Northumberland is a good place to grow older. It seeks to promote the health and wellbeing of older people within their local communities while also valuing the skills, experience and energy people offer. 

Ageing Well is co-ordinated by the involvement and service development team within adult community services.

The team offers to work closely with individuals and existing local community groups, helping to link local activity, initiatives and people to quality public service advice and information, particularly around health, wellbeing and social support. 

As people grow older and their needs change, we aim to ensure they are able to stay active, connected and well.
How does Ageing Well work?
Support may be offered to local communities to help them bring people together through seasonal events such as ‘Stepping into Spring’ or ‘Winter Warmer’.

Health promotion at these, and other smaller roadshows, link the promotion of local community activity with the overall aims of Ageing Well and seasonal health priorities, such as sun safety and hydration, flu jabs, staying warm, and avoiding slips, trips and falls.

Ageing Well also supports the development of community projects in response to identified needs. Examples include gardening activities for people with dementia; supported healthy walks; dementia awareness training in communities and for staff groups e.g. bus operators, landlords.

In 2015, we introduced the role of Ageing Well Allies. This involves bespoke training around age-related health and lifestyle issues for staff and volunteers in a natural position to highlight services and community activities promoting health, wellbeing and socialisation for the ageing population.  
What informs Ageing Well planning and development?
Ageing Well is funded by Northumberland County Council and supported by the active involvement of older people around the county. The Ageing Well Partnership Board maintains effective partnerships to develop a co-ordinated approach to the strategic planning for older people.

The Ageing Well Network supports the partnership between statutory and voluntary sector organisations, sharing information to ensure access to support and efficient use of resources.

Ageing Well and dementia forums provide information for individuals and give the opportunity for people who use our services to inform developments.

Our partners include Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, local community and voluntary organisations, housing associations and leisure services.
Ageing Well information pack
Welcome to the Ageing Well information pack

Ageing Well is a way of working with local people to ensure that Northumberland is a good place to live as we grow older.  The image below is called the Ageing Well wheel and it highlights a number of key areas.  The outer circle of the wheel shows where the people who are involved with Ageing Well come from: local communities as well as a variety of services and organisations which are part of public health, housing and planning, health and social care.

The values which underpin the Ageing Well concept are also listed around the perimeter of the wheel: staying connected, feeling included, staying healthy, working together, valuing experience, building on strengths and keeping safe.

The segments of the wheel which surround the Ageing Well logo, highlight the main activities which are central to Ageing Well: local events, training, involvement forums, annual health campaigns, the Ageing Well network (which meets on a quarterly basis), the partnership board, dementia awareness, Ageing Well allies, development projects and health improvement.

The purpose of this information pack is to provide more information about Ageing Well (for anyone who might be interested in getting involved), particularly in relation to the activities which are shown on the segments of the wheel.

Please click on each link to download sections of the resource pack:

Welcome and Ageing Well wheel 

Contents page

Introduction:
Introduction - What is Ageing Well?

Introduction - What Ageing Well can offer?

Introduction - Key contacts

Introduction - Ageing Well governance diagram

Resources:
Resources - Getting involved

Resources - Project developments

Resources - Health promotion campaigns 2016

Events:
Events - Local events

Events - Let's get started

Checklist - Choosing a venue

Template 1 - Risk assessment

Checklist 2 - Quick checklist

Checklist 3 - Creating a welcoming environment

Template 2 - Registration sheet

Template 3 - Evaluation (short)

Template 4 - Evaluation (long)

Template 5 - Poster (Stepping into Spring)

Template 6 - Poster (Winter Warmers)

Training:
Health trainer

Ageing Well allies

Practical dementia

Specialist HIMP service

















 
Contact adult social care
Dementia Awareness
Dementia is the term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by various diseases which cause difficulties in thinking, problem solving, communicating and memory which affect people’s daily lives. Dementia affects each person in different ways but some of the more common problems often affect the way someone interacts with other people or their actions.

 How many are affected in Northumberland?
Around 35,000 people living in the North East have dementia and this is expected to rise.
In Northumberland around 2,500 people have been diagnosed with dementia, along with many others not yet diagnosed but experiencing memory loss or other symptoms who live in the community.
 
Who is at risk?
The risk of developing dementia increases with age. It more often occurs in people over 65 but can affect younger people in their early to mid-50’s or 60’s. There are no obvious physical signs that show someone has dementia or memory problems. If you or someone you know is worried about their memory, encourage them to contact their GP for advice.
 
Awareness
Dementia is progressive so the effects get worse over time. However many people with dementia lead active and fulfilling lives for many years. It can’t be cured yet but can be slowed down and people helped to live with it. To do this they need the communities in which they live to be aware of dementia, inclusive of people living with dementia, and that businesses and services support customers with dementia.
In Northumberland we want to promote dementia awareness and develop partnerships to support people to get an early diagnosis and be able to continue to live safe and fulfilling lives in familiar surroundings.
By working together with partners we can all help to make our towns and villages more understanding and supportive of people experiencing some of the difficulties associated with having dementia.  
 
Living with dementia in the home
People with dementia tell us they want to be able to feel safe and able to continue to live in their own homes, which are familiar to them for as long as possible. To help with this, all new housing developments in Northumberland consider how to best support people with dementia. The University of Stirling’s Dementia Services Development Centre has produced guidance for professionals including Designing Interiors for People with Dementia. By using this guidance new homes are now more suitable for people currently living with dementia and for those who develop the condition in the future.
 
Helping and caring for those living with dementia
Part of the Ageing Well in Northumberland programme is about bringing together local partners to help them understand and respond to the needs of all older people including people with dementia. This is done locally through training, information, activities and support to help people stay active and connected to others.
For further information on living with or caring for someone with dementia, practical advice and guidance to help shape how services are designed and delivered, click on one of the following Links:
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/dementia-guide/pages/dementia-carers.aspx
http://www.dementiaaction.org.uk/resources/toolkits?tags%5B%5D=Toolkits&tags%5B%5D=&tags%5B%5D=&tags%5B%5D=
 

Dementia Awareness

Dementia is the term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by various diseases which cause difficulties in thinking, problem solving, communicating and memory which affect people’s daily lives. Dementia affects each person in different ways but some of the more common problems often affect the way someone interacts with other people or their actions.

How many people are affected in Northumberland?
Around 35,000 people living in the North East have dementia and this is expected to rise. 
In Northumberland around 2,500 people have been diagnosed with dementia, along with many others not yet diagnosed but experiencing memory loss or other symptoms who live in the community.
Who is at risk?
The risk of developing dementia increases with age. It more often occurs in people over 65 but can affect younger people in their early to mid-50’s or 60’s. There are no obvious physical signs that show someone has dementia or memory problems. If you or someone you know is worried about their memory, encourage them to contact their GP for advice.
Awareness
Dementia is progressive so the effects get worse over time. However many people with dementia lead active and fulfilling lives for many years. It can’t be cured yet but can be slowed down and people helped to live with it. To do this they need the communities in which they live to be aware of dementia, inclusive of people living with dementia, and that businesses and services support customers with dementia.

In Northumberland we want to promote dementia awareness and develop partnerships to support people to get an early diagnosis and be able to continue to live safe and fulfilling lives in familiar surroundings.

By working together with partners we can all help to make our towns and villages more understanding and supportive of people experiencing some of the difficulties associated with having dementia. 
Living with dementia in the home
People with dementia tell us they want to be able to feel safe and able to continue to live in their own homes, which are familiar to them for as long as possible. To help with this, all new housing developments in Northumberland consider how to best support people with dementia. The University of Stirling’s Dementia Services Development Centre has produced guidance for professionals including Designing Interiors for People with Dementia. By using this guidance new homes are now more suitable for people currently living with dementia and for those who develop the condition in the future.
Helping and caring for those living with dementia
Part of the Ageing Well in Northumberland programme is about bringing together local partners to help them understand and respond to the needs of all older people including people with dementia. This is done locally through training, information, activities and support to help people stay active and connected to others.

For further information on living with or caring for someone with dementia, practical advice and guidance to help shape how services are designed and delivered, click on one of the following Links: