Grass cutting

Information about Grass cutting done by Northumberland county council

Grass cutting operations commence from the beginning of April continuing until end of September, depending on conditions. Grass cutting will continue in most weather conditions.

Report a Issue with grass cutting

Additional cuts may be requested by Parish & Town Councils and Housing Companies in October and March.

If a member of the public is particularly concerned about grass on footpaths they can report the problem

 

Report a Issue with grass cutting online

 

or ring  Customer Services on 0845 6006400

or email ask@northumberland.gov.uk and we will endeavour to sweep the area.

Built up areas

The council uses rotary and flail mowers for the general amenity grass on housing estates, parks,schools, highways verges (30mph) and open spaces throughout the county.

How often do we cut the grass?

We cut the grass about 10 to 13 times, during the core period.  This equates to about once every 14 days.  However, this very much depends on the weather conditions.  During prolonged dry spells, for example, it is not necessary to cut the grass quite so often and, doing so frequently, might even damage it.

Grass can also be spoilt if cutting is attempted when it is too wet.  In these circumstances, grass cutting may be suspended. Any excessive growth will be removed as soon as possible after conditions improve.

What is important, is the appearance of the grass throughout the season not how often it is cut, this is best maintained by having regular cuts between April and September. We cut around obstacles, such as trees, for example, by strimming or, in some cases, we use approved weed control. 

Rural areas

The council use tractor mounted flail mowers for the out of town amenity and county lane grass on highway verges (60mph) throughout the county.

The aim is to cut grass twice per season (late May & August) to prevent excessive arisings and sweep up.

Grass Cuttings

We do not collect grass cuttings except on plots within elderly people’s residential developments, such as sheltered accommodation. 

We cut almost one million square metres of grass about once every 14 days. 

To collect and transport cuttings for composting, would be very costly, uneconomical and environmentally unfriendly, partly because of the additional travel involved.

What about daffodils and other flowers?

Some grassed areas that we look after contain spring bulbs, mainly daffodils and crocuses. Daffodils bloom from March to May and, where these are planted, we allow the green leaf of the plant to remain for about six weeks after the flower has died off. This is because it is the leaf of the plant that makes food for the following year. 

If they were cut down too early, then the daffodil beds would gradually deteriorate and the number of flowering plants would be reduced.

If a member of the public is particularly concerned about grass on footpaths they can report the problem

Report a Issue with grass cutting online

 to Customer Services on 0845 6006400  or email ask@northumberland.gov.uk and we will endeavour to sweep the area.