Tobacco control

Tobacco control

National data

  • It is estimated that 87% of deaths from lung cancer, 74% of deaths from upper respiratory cancer and 86% of deaths from chronic obstructive lung disease are attributable to smoking.
  • Seven smokers in every ten say they want to quit, but only half respond positively when asked about taking immediate action on their smoking behaviour.  Each year, around 5% of smokers report that they use the NHS stop smoking service.
  • The general household survey is used to assess smoking prevalence in adults (aged 16 years and above) and shows that smoking prevalence for England has steadily declined over the last decade from 27% in 2000 to 21% in 2008.
  • For 2005-2007, it is estimated that within England, 210 in every 100,000 deaths were linked to smoking.
  • In 2008/09, NHS stop smoking services supported 337,054 people across England to quit smoking (to be self-reported four week smoking quitters). This is equivalent to quit rate of 813 persons for every 100,000 people aged 16 and over.
  • For 2005-2007, it is estimated that within England, 210 in every 100,000 deaths were linked to smoking.

Regional data

  • Since 2007, the North East has no longer had the highest regional smoking prevalence and the region has made significant progress in narrowing the prevalence gap with England.
  • For 2005-2007, it is estimated that for the North East region, rates of smoking are attributable to mortality are 268 per 100,000, which is significantly higher than the England average.
  • In 2008/09, NHS stop smoking services supported 22,325 people across the North East to quit smoking (to be self-reported four week smoking quitters). This is the equivalent to a quit rate of 1,063 persons for every 100,000 people aged 16 and above.

Local data

  • Smoking among young people has remained relatively stable since 1998, however, there is no local data to  monitor prevalence.
  • In 2014/15 in Northumberland, 14.2% of pregnant women were smokers at the time of delivery.
  • In the absence of robust local data, synthetic estimates based on the health survey for England are used to compare smoking prevalence in adults (aged 16 and over) in local authorities.  These show that for 2003-2005, estimated smoking prevalence for Northumberland was 23.5%, however, looking at the former districts of Northumberland, estimated prevalence ranged from 16.2% in castle Morpeth to 28.7% in Wansbeck.
  • Local alternatives to using synthetic estimates include the use of GP practice register data. For Northumberland, this suggests that smoking prevalence amongst persons aged 16 and above is around 18%.
  • For 2005-2007, it is estimated that for Northumberland, rates of smoking attributable to mortality are 228, per 100,000, which is significantly higher than the England average.
  • Northumberland also has a relatively high rate of smoking attributable mortality when compared to similar PCTs (using the prospering smaller towns group of the ONS area classification)
  • In 2008/09, NHS stop smoking services supported 2,203 people across the Northumberland to quit smoking (to be self-reported four week smoking quitters), which is the equivalent to a quit rate of 859 persons for every 100,000 people aged 16 and above.
  • Northumberland also has a relatively high smoking quit rate when compared to similar PCTs (using the prospering smaller towns group of the ONS area classification) and a higher than expected quit rate, when taking into account, the estimated prevalence of smoking in the population.

Profiles

Additional statistics will appear here soon

More information available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/local-tobacco-control-profiles-for-england​ and the NHS information centre.