Unpaid care in Northumberland - 2011 Census

Unpaid care in Northumberland - 2011 Census

Analysis from the latest (2011) census shows that the number of people in Northumberland providing unpaid care has increased in the last 10 years from 33,609 to 35,697. The percentage of the population who are unpaid carers has slightly increased from 10.9% to 11.3%. The percentage of the population who are providing more than 20 hours unpaid care has increased slightly from 3.6% to 4.2%.

The recorded number of people providing unpaid care fewer than 20 hours per week has fallen over the past 10 years (a decrease of 356 carers). The recorded number of people providing more than 20 hours care continues to rise (an increase of almost 2.5 thousand in the last ten years).

More than 20 hours is the point at which caring starts to significantly impact on the health and wellbeing of the carer, and their ability to hold down paid employment alongside their caring responsibilities.
  • more than 13,000 people provide more than 20 hours of care, which is an increase of 22% in 10 years
  • nearly 9,000 people provide over 50 hours of care, which is an increase of 17% in 10 years

Young carers - 2011 census

The 2001 census found 175,000 young carers in the UK. Some 13,000 are providing more than 50 hours of help a week. Recent estimates are nearer to 700,000 young carers. The vast majority (85%) of all children providing care are caring for one to 19 hours per week. This is a wide range which means caring will affect these young people in different ways.

The 2001 census identified 806 young carers in Northumberland aged 5-18 who provided care, some up to 50 hours or more per week.
The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, concludes that 4% of children will be young carers at some point in their childhood. 57% of known young carers are girls and 43% are boys.

This amounts to at least 2,000 children and young people of school age in Northumberland, but this is still considered a conservative estimate. This figure is more than doubled taking into account the transition into adulthood and young adults up to 25 who take on the caring role instead of higher education/work.

More detailed figures showing the profile of carers in Northumberland by location and age will be available soon.